first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest On Sept. 19 we got an inch or an inch and a half. It evened up the beans a little. We let it dry on Sunday and got started on that Monday with corn harvest in one of our worst fields right across from the shop. I am coming up with an 85-bushel average. We can’t even keep the yield monitor calibrated right with this corn because you don’t have a constant flow. There is 20-bushel corn and 200-bushel corn in the same field. Anytime there is a hill or slope where the water could get away you have good corn. Where you have low ground or no tile there is nothing there. We took off 150 acres of corn and it has not been pretty. It is 18% to 21% moisture and the test weight is around 56 and I am afraid it is going to get worse.We are cutting beans in Van Wert now. I think we’ll see some 100- to 150-bushel corn and in Hancock County it will be up there hopefully around 180 or 200. There is good corn out there but those holes are still there too. Everything we tried — foliar feeding, fungicide, extra nitrogen — it didn’t help the corn. We wasted quite a bit of money but we had to try something.I feel better about the beans. We have run beans from 60 bushels on down to 35-bushel beans where the water did more damage. We have been pleasantly surprised with the beans, but I had a friend call me and tell me that he was running 12% moisture beans and the yield was lower than the moisture.Beans are really too dry. They were down to 10%. We aren’t making a mark on the ground with the equipment. We are doing some tillage where some tile lines settled out.Saturday we planted 56 aces of wheat and we are planting another 75 acres of wheat where we want to tile. Right now we are calling it a cover crop. We’ll see how it makes it through winter and what the markets do. We’ll finish wheat and start planting cereal rye with the air seeder for a cover crop.last_img

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