New Zealand retail betting outlets close as racing suspended

first_img New Zealand Racing and the TAB have taken the decision to close all retail sites and temporarily suspend racing after the national government announced that it would move the country to Alert Level 4 of the Covid-19 alert system later today (25 March). New Zealand retail betting outlets close as racing suspended AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter New Zealand Racing and the TAB have taken the decision to close all retail sites and temporarily suspend racing after the national government announced that it would move the country to Alert Level 4 of the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) alert system later today (25 March).New measures outlined by the government ban all indoor and outdoor public gatherings, while all non-essential businesses have been ordered to close amid the pandemic.Betting will still be available on the TAB website during this period, but all retail locations will be closed. Racing will be suspended until at least 21 April, after an agreement was reached with New Zealand Thoroughbred Racing and Harness Racing New Zealand.Meanwhile, Dean McKenzie, executive chair of the New Zealand Racing Industry Transitional Authority (RITA), has issued a new update to the country’s racing sector in regards to the current situation over Covid-19.McKenzie said that with the suspension of domestic racing, in effect, the market has lost at least 75% of its content. This comes after RITA experienced a 27% drop in turnover following the cancellation of other sports events around the world.This, McKenzie said, will continue to cause problems for RITA, but added that the organisation has taken a number of steps to help reduce the impact of cancelled and suspended events.“While we continue to present whatever racing is available on Trackside (with a radio simulcast on Trackside Radio) and provide as much product as we can on TAB.co.nz, the reality is when we are not selling bets, we’re not generating any revenue, and therefore we are losing money every day,” McKenzie said.“Our immediate focus at RITA has been to inject whatever content we can, such as offering esports for the first time and reducing our expenditure as much as possible.“We’ve peeled back costs, put in a limited production on Trackside, suspended contracts where possible and we continue to look at every other aspect of our operations to identify cost savings.”In terms of help for the racing industry, McKenzie recommended that those in the market read the dedicated government-run website to find out about the financial support available to the sector. Current initiatives include a wage subsidy scheme, leave and self-isolation support and business cash flow and tax measures.“We need to deal with this change by quickly adapting, innovating, looking after each other and working together,” McKenzie said. “The racing codes and the TAB are working closely to do everything we can to keep the wheels of commerce turning for the industry and we all play a part in keeping our events going.“We appreciate our industry will want a level of certainty as soon as possible, but that will take time, so please be patient as we work through this. We are working closely with the Codes and meeting on a daily basis to explore what steps we can collectively take in response to the impact of Covid-19.“As an industry we have some mighty challenges ahead, that is for certain, but by working together we do give ourselves the best chance of coming out the other side.”New Zealand is the latest country to suspend horse racing due to the outbreak of coronavirus. British racing was halted on 17 March and will not resume until the end of April at the earliest, while Ireland yesterday also stopped all sport, including racing, until further notice. Regions: Oceania New Zealand Finance Topics: Finance Sports betting Strategy Horse racing Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter 25th March 2020 | By contenteditor Tags: Race Track and Racino Email Addresslast_img read more

Anglo American Plc (ANGLO.bw) 2016 Annual Report

first_imgAnglo American Plc (ANGLO.bw) listed on the Botswana Stock Exchange under the Mining sector has released it’s 2016 annual report.For more information about Anglo American Plc (ANGLO.bw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Anglo American Plc (ANGLO.bw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Anglo American Plc (ANGLO.bw)  2016 annual report.Company ProfileAnglo American Plc is a diversified mining enterprise with extensive interests in gold, platinum, diamonds, coal, metals, industrial minerals, paper and packaging, and financial and technological support. Anglo American Plc has an international footprint, with operations and undeveloped resources in Africa, Europe, South and North America and Australia. Anglo American’s diamond interests are represented by a 45% share holding in De Beers. The company produces approximately 35% (by value) of the world’s rough diamonds from its mines in Botswana, Canada, Namibia and South Africa. The government of the Republic of Botswana has a 15% beneficial interest. De Beers is a 50/50 partner with GRB in the Debswana Diamond Company. Debswana operates two of the world’s largest diamond mines in Botswana; Jwaneng and Orapa Mines.last_img read more

Navajo mission finds fertile ground for water conservation project

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Church-Community Agriculture, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Navajoland, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI United Thank Offering Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Waffle beds are among the water-saving techniques Good Shepherd Mission in Fort Defiance, Arizona, is using as it grows its farming ministry with the help of a UTO grant. Photo: Good Shepherd Mission[Episcopal News Service] Arizona may sound like the last place you’d find a dynamic agricultural enterprise, but the work underway in the Navajoland Area Mission is gathering the seeds of history, culture, tradition, environmental stewardship and spirituality to cultivate a local ministry with sky’s-the-limit potential for a small Episcopal congregation here.Gardening has been alive for decades at Good Shepherd Mission in Fort Defiance, Arizona. Now, local leaders are looking for ways to expand those efforts while emphasizing conservation, particularly of water. Native American traditions and Episcopal teachings overlap on that point – the importance of protecting the Earth and our God-given resources, said the Rev. Cynthia Hizer, Good Shepherd’s vicar.“The indigenous people have been the environmentalists for as long as they’ve been here,” Hizer said. “The way they step out into the world is honoring creation.”The latest initiative to till this fertile ground is the Protecting the Precious water conservation project at Good Shepherd Mission, which this week is installing a rainwater collection system to augment the congregation’s farming operation. An additional component of the project will involve teaching water-saving farming techniques to would-be farmers on the Navajo reservation.“Water is such an issue in the West,” Good Shepherd head gardener Margaret Putnam said. The mission’s half-acre garden uses a drip irrigation system fed by municipal water, but the congregation hopes to plant a full field of crops on an additional half acre with the rainwater it collects.Conservation is itself a goal of the project, Putnam added. Using less municipal water is the right thing to do, especially in a dry climate like Arizona’s.Good Shepherd Mission’s has focused on blue corn; whose pollen also plays in role traditional Navajo ceremonies. Photo: Good Shepherd Mission/FacebookRain collection at Good Shepherd has been backed by a $41,500 grant from the Episcopal Church’s United Thank Offering program, or UTO. The grant application noted that the high-desert region has a long history of farming and animal grazing, but those traditions have diminished over the decades, partly because of environmental degradation.A particularly shocking and devastating recent case was the accidental release of toxic chemicals into the Animas River from a former Colorado mine in August 2015. The waste from that spill made it all the way to the San Juan River, one of the water sources for the Navajoland farm at St. Christopher’s in Bluff, Utah, and some of that mission’s crops were wiped out.Since then, St. Christopher’s has decided to tap into artesian wells for some of its crop irrigation, so it doesn’t have to rely solely on the river anymore, said the Rev. Leon Sampson, a deacon.The Protecting the Precious grant application also notes that decades of mining has lowered the water table on the reservation and contaminated much of the remaining water. Nutrient depletion, erosion and pesticide use are other factors that pose challenges to Navajo farmers.The solution proposed by the water conservation project at Good Shepherd starts small but has growth potential as the congregation leads by example and teaches conservation to others.“It excites us to think that those participating in this initiative will deepen their respect for the land,” Navajoland’s grant application said. “Protecting the Precious can transform how we interact with the natural world.”Navajoland is a collection of Episcopal missions in Arizona, New Mexico and Utah that serve the 250,000 people on the 27,000-square-mile Navajo reservation. The missions technically don’t make up a diocese because they still are working toward becoming financially self-sustaining. An estimated 43 percent of the Navajo population lives under the poverty line, so Episcopal leaders are looking to entrepreneurialism to achieve their goal of self-sustainability and to lift others out of poverty.There’s the beekeeping operation that is taking shape at Good Shepherd and St. Christopher’s. The missions are working together to turn blue corn flour production into a cottage industry. And Good Shepherd’s hand-made soaps business is taking off.Hizer has been a big part of that growth since she arrived early last year, and recently she was named to Navajoland Bishop David Bailey’s staff as canon for development and social enterprise.“I came with a passion,” said Hizer, who previously served in the Diocese of Atlanta and oversaw a garden there.Sunflowers growing in Good Shepherd Mission’s garden. Photo: Good Shepherd Mission/FacebookPutnam had worked with Hizer as a church gardener in Atlanta, and the two women were recruited for Good Shepherd because of that expertise. Along with a passion for farming, Hizer and Putnam brought with them knowledge of different cultivation techniques, some of which are being put to use at Good Shepherd.One efficient method for conserving water is planting in waffle beds: A garden plot is crosshatched – like a giant waffle – building up the dirt so that water collects at the bottom of each square and doesn’t runoff.Berms, or raised beds, and swales, shallow depressions used to catch rainwater, also can be used to catch and direct rainwater.“There is water,” Hizer said. “You just have to get it in the right place and not let it go downhill.”But such conservation techniques only collect rainwater that falls on or next to the half-acre garden, squandering plenty of rain that falls elsewhere. With its UTO grant, Good Shepherd will start collecting rain that falls on three of the mission’s 12 buildings, especially in the rainy season from late June to early September, and funnel it into tanks holding thousands of gallons of water that then can be used to irrigate the crops.More water will enable Good Shepherd to double its growing capacity when it adds a half-acre field to its garden plots, Putnam said.The garden already is a focal point socially for the congregation. The hours following Sunday worship are particularly ripe for members to work the soil, Hizer said. After coffee hour, some head down to the garden plots and plant or pick vegetables, or they may discuss traditional Navajo recipes they will use when cooking up the fresh harvest.In the past, the garden has grown a wide variety of vegetables for the congregation to prepare and serve, as well as to sell at a local farmer’s market. This year, while still growing squash, beans and sunflowers, the primary focus has been blue corn, because Good Shepherd is working with St. Christopher’s on a UTO-backed project to brand and market blue corn for sale as flour.Farming is a pastime that reaches back generations. Maggie Brown, a senior warden at Good Shepherd, grows some corn on her property, just as her father did before her. Some parts of the crops, like blue corn pollen, also play a role in traditional Navajo ceremonies, she said.Brown sees value in farming as an outreach opportunity for the mission.“Working on the field gives us a chance to mingle with the congregation and whoever is there to help,” she said.Sampson, the deacon at St. Christopher’s, was instrumental in creating and developing what is known as the Homer Dale Community Farm there, first as farm manager and later as a deacon. His farming has a strong spiritual side, incorporating prayer and showing humility, and he saw the mission farm as a way to bridge the gap between elders who grew up with farming and young people who have lost connection to the land.“We created space for teaching the next generation,” Sampson said.One child told Sampson of his farm back home – he said it had zombies that ate the onions. Sampson realized the child was talking about a video game. “Our zombies are called chipmunks and rabbits,” he told the boy, before sharing real-world lessons in gardening and faith.“Really, the farm grew in spirituality and community,” he said.Good Shepherd Mission is near the tribal seat of government in Window Rock, Arizona, and Hizer envisions partnering with tribal authorities to educate reservation residents on farming techniques. She also has an idea for a Food Network-style cooking show featuring recipes that use ingredients familiar to the Navajo.For now, she and the rest of the Good Shepherd congregation have plenty to do as their expanded farming ministry takes root.“With each little success that we have, we can expand a little bit,” she said.– David Paulsen is a freelance writer based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Wauwatosa. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Navajo mission finds fertile ground for water conservation project ‘Protecting the Precious’ is latest farm-based project in Navajoland Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY By David PaulsenPosted Sep 30, 2016 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

Updating Breaking News: Apopka man dies in motorcycle crash

first_img UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter From the Florida Highway PatrolAn Apopka man died in the early morning hours today after he lost control of his motorcycle and crashed, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.At approximately 4 am on Sunday morning, Fredrick Murphy, 50 of Apopka, was traveling from State Road 536 onto eastbound Interstate 4, and for an unknown reason lost control of his 2009 Kawasaki motorcycle. The Kawasaki overturned and Murphy was ejected, according to the FHP report.Murphy was transported to Florida Hospital Celebration by the Orange County Fire Rescue paramedics where he later died from the injuries sustained in the crash.The incident remains under investigation according to FHP. Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 TAGSFlorida Highway PatrolOrange County Fire Rescue Previous articleA time to prepare for hurricanes and other emotional storms to comeNext articleThe best news of the week Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address herelast_img read more

How to be a good digital citizen during the election –…

first_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your comment! You are a key player in efforts to curb misinformation online.John Fedele/The Image Bank via Getty Images LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.center_img Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 By Kolina Koltai, Postdoctoral Researcher of Information Studies, University of WashingtonIn the runup to the U.S. presidential election there has been an unprecedented amount of misinformation about the voting process and mail-in ballots. It’s almost certain that misinformation and disinformation will increase, including, importantly, in the aftermath of the election. Misinformation is incorrect or misleading information, and disinformation is misinformation that is knowingly and deliberately propagated.While every presidential election is critical, the stakes feel particularly high given the challenges of 2020.I study misinformation online, and I can caution you about the kind of misinformation you may see on Tuesday and the days after, and I can offer you advice about what you can do to help prevent its spread. A fast-moving 24/7 news cycle and social media make it incredibly easy to share content. Here are steps you can take to be a good digital citizen and avoid inadvertently contributing to the problem.Election misinformationRecent reports by disinformation researchers highlight the potential for an enormous amount of misleading information and disinformation to spread rapidly on Election Day and the days following. People spreading disinformation may be trying to sway the election one way or the other or simply undermine confidence in the election and American democracy in general.U.S. intelligence services have reported that the Russian government is orchestrating disinformation campaigns aimed at the U.S. elections and pandemic response. AP Photo/Pavel GolovkinThis report by the Election Integrity Partnership (EIP) details narratives meant to delegitimize the election and show how uncertainty creates opportunities for misinformation to flourish.In particular, you may end up seeing misleading information shared about voting in person, mail-in ballots, the day-of voting experience and the results of the election. You may see stories online circulating about coronavirus outbreaks or infections at polling locations, violence or threats of intimidation at polling locations, misinformation about when, where and how to vote, and stories of voting suppression through long lines at polling stations and people being turned away.We likely won’t know the results on Election Day, and this delay is both anticipated and legitimate. There may be misinformation about the winner of the presidential election and the final counting of ballots, especially with the increase in mail-in ballots in response to the coronavirus pandemic. It will be important to know that not every state finalizes their official ballot count on Nov. 3, and there may be narratives that threaten the legitimacy of the election results, like people claiming their vote did not get counted or saying they found discarded completed ballots.What if the source of misinformation is … you?There is a lot you can do to help reduce the spread of election misinformation online. This can happen both accidentally and intentionally, and there are both foreign and domestic actors who create disinformation campaigns. But ultimately, you have the power to not share content.Sharing mis/disinformation gives it power. Regardless of your demographic, you can be susceptible to misinformation, and sometimes specifically targeted by disinformation. One of the biggest steps you can take to be a good digital citizen this election season is not to contribute to the sharing of misinformation. This can be surprisingly difficult, even with the best of intentions.One type of misinformation that has been popular leading up to the election – and is likely to remain popular – is “friend of a friend” claims. These claims are often unverified stories without attribution that are quickly spread by people copy and pasting the same story across their networks.You may see these claims as social media statuses like a Facebook post or an Instagram Story, or even as a bit of text forwarded to you in a group chat. They are often text-based, with no name attached to the story, but instead forwarded along by a “friend of a friend.”This type of misinformation is popular to share because the stories can center around the good intentions of wanting to inform others, and they often provide a social context, for example my friend’s doctor or my brother’s co-worker, that can make the stories seem legitimate. However, these often provide no actual evidence or proof of the claim and should not be shared, even if you believe the information is useful. It could be misleading.How to avoid spreading misinformationMany useful resources are available about how to identify misinformation, which can guide you on what to share and not to share. You can improve your ability to spot misinformation and learn to avoid being duped by disinformation campaigns.Tips for spotting misinformation online.A key approach is the Stop, Investigate, Find and Trace (SIFT) technique, a fact-checking process developed by digital literacy expert Mike Caulfield of Washington State University Vancouver.Following this technique, when you encounter something you want to share online, you can stop and check to see if you know the website or source of the information. Then investigate the source and find out where the story is coming from. Then find trusted coverage to see if there is a consensus among media sources about the claim. Finally, trace claims, quotes and media back to their original contexts to see if things were taken out of context or manipulated.Finally, you may want to share your own experience with voting this year on social media. Following the recommendation of Election Integrity Project, it is a good idea to share positive experiences about voting. Go ahead and share your “I voted” sticker selfie. Sharing stories about how people socially distanced and wore masks at polling locations can highlight the positive experiences of voting in-person.However, EIP cautions about posting about negative experiences. While negative experiences warrant attention, a heavy focus on them can stoke feelings of disenfranchisement, which could suppress voter turnout. Further, once you post something on social media, it can be taken out of context and used to advanced narratives that you may not support.Most people care about the upcoming election and informing people in their networks. It is only natural to want to share important and critical information about the election. However, I urge you to practice caution in these next few weeks when sharing information online. While it’s probably not possible to stop all disinformation at its source, we the people can do our part to stop its spread.This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. TAGSDigitalDisinformationElectionsMisinformationPrevent the SpreadSocial MediaThe Conversationtips Previous articleOrange Co. Animal Services launches free spay/neuter program for low-income residents’ petsNext articleAdventHealth begins recruiting participants for Phase 3 COVID-19 investigational vaccine clinical trial Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear last_img read more

Quebrada House / UNarquitectura

first_img Houses “COPY” Year:  CopyHouses•Curacaví, Chile CopyAbout this officeUNarquitecturaOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesWoodCuracavíChilePublished on March 10, 2019Cite: “Quebrada House / UNarquitectura” [Casa Quebrada / UNarquitectura] 10 Mar 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldChoosing the Skyfold Wall for Your SpaceGlass3MSun Control Window Film in MarkthalBathroom AccessorieshansgroheBath & Shower ThermostatsCabinetsFlorenseCabinet – FloAirWood Boards / HPL PanelsBruagStair Railing – CELLON®LightsLouis PoulsenOutdoor Lighting – Flindt GardenBathroom AccessoriesBradley Corporation USAHigh Speed Hand Dryers – Aerix+BoardsForestOneLaminate – EGGER laminatesAcousticSchöckStaircase Insulation – Tronsole®Metal PanelsRHEINZINKPanel Systems – Horizontal PanelWall / Ceiling LightsA-LightAccolade Wall Light at River Dental OfficeBricksStröherClinker Brick Slips – StiltreuMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Chile Save this picture!© Natalia Vial+ 10Curated by Diego Hernández Share Quebrada House / UNarquitecturaSave this projectSaveQuebrada House / UNarquitectura Projects Save this picture!© Natalia VialRecommended ProductsWindowsVEKAWindows – SOFTLINE 82 ADWindowsVitrocsaMinimalist Window – SlidingWoodBruagBalcony BalustradesWoodSculptformTimber Click-on BattensText description provided by the architects. Retreat located in a forest on a creek in central Chile. Located on the creek, elevated by pilotis, it is accessible through a bridge and has views at the level of the foliage of trees.Save this picture!© Natalia VialSave this picture!PlanSave this picture!© Natalia VialThe house “breaks” adapting to the slope and differentiating the private and public space within a single enclosure.Save this picture!© Natalia VialProject gallerySee allShow lessBig Mouth House / Best Practice ArchitectureSelected ProjectsCasa Scout / BAAGSelected Projects Share 2013 “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/484584/quebrada-house-unarquitectura Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/484584/quebrada-house-unarquitectura Clipboard Quebrada House / UNarquitectura Architects: UNarquitectura Year Completion year of this architecture project ArchDailylast_img read more

Soil Association releases new list of responders

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 21 January 2003 | News Soil Association releases new list of responders  28 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis “I believe this list will work well for any campaign wishing to target mail responsive, educated, health aware prospects,” says Catherine Brocklehurst, List Manager of Occam. Base rental costs are £75 per 1,000 names. Selections include; recency, gender and geography and are available at £5 per 1,000 each.Contact Karen Balmforth at Occam Direct Marketing. The Soil Association has released its brand new mailing list of 41,158 responders exclusively through Occam Direct Marketing.The new responders list from the The Soil Association, the campaigning and certification organisation for organic food and farming, is comprised of responders to various Soil Association projects, such as regular buyers of home delivered organic food boxes.Recent profiling carried out through Experian has identified the list as predominantly female (80%) with no age bias. Occam Direct comment: “There is a high incidence of housewives and white collar employees with incomes in excess of £15,000 p.a.” The majority are home owners (detached or semi-detached) and active mail order buyers. Their interests include; books, gardening, aerobics, keep fit, swimming, cycling, golf. They also support environmental, human rights, animal welfare, children and medical charities. Advertisementlast_img read more

22 charities commit to better action on safeguarding in joint letter

first_img Tagged with: International Oxfam safeguarding About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.  Increasing the resources they devote to safeguarding. Collectively reviewing current referencing systems so that people found to have abused their power or behaved inappropriately are not re-employed in the sector.Working with authorities and regulatory bodies to ensure any individual caught abusing their power cannot do so again.Working with the government to overcome legal and institutional barriers to rigorous background checks in the UK.The charities also ask for people’s support in helping them tackle abuse by confronting it whenever it is apparent and reporting unacceptable behaviour:“Our collective mission is to do much more than that – the challenge we face in our own organisations is a challenge for the whole of society. This is something that requires leadership in every sector – and we ask people from all walks of life and all corners of our communities to help us to strengthen safeguards, tackle abuse and stand up for the vulnerable – and to call out inappropriate behaviour wherever we see it.”The letter, and the list of the 22 charities involved can be read in full on the Bond site. It follows this month’s news of misconduct among Oxfam staff in Haiti, and the resignation of UNICEF UK Deputy Executive Director Justin Forsyth.  159 total views,  3 views today 22 charities commit to better action on safeguarding in joint letter Twenty-two UK charities have written a joint letter committing to better action on safeguarding, in light of the recent revelations of misconduct from organisations including Oxfam GB.The charities, which include Oxfam GB, Plan International UK, UNICEF UK, Save the Children UK, WaterAid, VSO, Bond, and ActionAid UK,  say that there can be no tolerance of abuses of power, privilege or trust in their organisations or in their work, and that they will take every step necessary to right these wrongdoings.The letter states:“There can be no tolerance for the abuse of power, privilege or trust within our organisations or in our work. We have an absolute duty to our staff, our supporters and, above all, the people we seek to help to ensure we do everything in our power to prevent, detect and eradicate unacceptable behaviour.”It also says they must honour “the rights and needs of the communities we work with, by continuing to deliver vital aid but also changing fundamentally”, and that they are “truly sorry that at times our sector has failed”.In the letter, the charities announce a series of ‘urgent and immediate’ measures they are committing to as a first step. These are: Advertisementcenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis19  160 total views,  4 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis19 Melanie May | 26 February 2018 | Newslast_img read more

Activists protest postal service privatization

first_imgMembers of Communities and Postal Workers United and Community- Labor United for Postal Jobs and Services attended the quadrennial AFL-CIO convention here from Sept. 8 to 11. The postal activists were there to broaden the movement to save the U.S. Postal Service.They handed out hundreds of “Privatization hurts all workers” fliers and CPWU newsletters. At least 400 signatures were gathered on petitions; many signers expressed interest in doing more to save the post office in their cities and towns.“Resolution 40: A Postal Service for the 21st Century: Innovation and Growth, Not Downsizing and Decline” was passed unanimously by the convention delegates, after remarks from Western Regional Coordinator Omar Gonzales, of the American Postal Workers Union; President John Haggerty, of the National Postal Mail Handlers Union; and President Fred Rolando, of the National Association of Letter Carriers.Piette is a retired postal worker. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January -December 2020)

first_img as a result of the Covid-19 epidemic. Several journalists are ill and are being denied medical attention. They included >span class=”redactor-unlink”>Soheil Arabi, a recipient of the RSF Press Freedom Prize in 2017 in the citizen-journalist category, who began a hunger strike on 4 April in protest against his prison conditions. Both he and journalist and human rights defender Narges Mohammadi could die. In a third letter to the head of the judicial system, Mohammadi’s mother writes: “Not only has my daughter’s health worsened yet again but we are also under pressure [from the security forces] to say nothing.” ———- Mostafa Moheb Kia, a journalist with the monthly Iran Farda, was sentenced to six months and one day in prison on 10 August for “anti-government propaganda” and “meeting and plotting against national security.” He received the sentence two weeks after an appeal court, on 27 July, confirmed the three-year jail sentence that Iran Farda editor Kayvan Samimi Behbahani received from a Tehran revolutionary court on 13 June. A distinguished 72-year-old journalist, Behbahani was summoned to begin serving this sentence on 24 August. After the letter’s publication, the authorities tightened Mehdi Karoubi’s house arrest conditions, banning family visits. He was placed under house arrest in February 2011 at the same time as Mir Hossein Mousavi, a former prime minister and owner of the now closed newspaper Kalameh Sabaz, and Mousavi’s wife, the writer Zahra Rahnavard. The two former presidential candidates and newspaper owners continue to be deprived of all their rights. Organisation Citing official documents, Mousavi said several newspaper owners had been sent more newsprint than they needed and had made sizable illicit profits by selling the surplus newsprint on the black market. Most of the beneficiaries of this system of corruption were pro-government newspapers, he reported. After being interrogated, Mousavi was released conditionally pending another hearing.———– 02.12.2020 – Four journalists arrested in past ten days Darioush Moradi, a member of the staff of the cultural news website Hasareh, and Anisa Jafari Meher, who writes for the Kurdish-language quarterly J, were arrested on 23 and 25 November respectively in the southwestern city of Eslamabad after ministry of intelligence officials searched their home. Their families and lawyers do not yet know where or why they are being held.———- After Hengameh Shahidi’s pardon, RSF asks Supreme Leader to free all imprisoned journalists ————Press freedom violations recounted in real time January (January -December 2019) RSF has also learned that the writer and art critic Hamid Namjoo has been sentenced to a year in prison for “propaganda against the Islamic Republic” in writings published abroad, including on the website of Radio Zamaneh, a Persian-language radio station based in Amsterdam. He is the brother of a well-known Iranian singer who lives in New York.———-22.04.2020 – Well-known journalist sentenced in absentia to five years in prison RSF has also learned that Jelveh Javaheri, Kaveh Mzadari and Forough Sameinia, three journalists who were arrested in the northern province of Gilan on 26 December and were bailed three weeks later, were summoned before a court in Rasht, the province’s largest city, on 16 May. The three journalists, who work for various online news media including Bidarzani (Women’s Awakening), were arrested during a ceremony held in Sowme’eh Sara, in Gilan province, to pay tribute to a demonstrator killed during an anti-government protest in November. They were released on bail of 100 million toman (27,000 euros) on 14 and 16 January pending trial.  ———-02.06.2020 – Journalist freed on bail, three others receive court summons ————Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January -December 2017) ———- 03.11.2020 – Two women journalists arrested Karoubi’s arrest seems to be a reprisal for the publication of an open letter that Karoubi’s father, Etemad Meli owner and former parliamentary speaker Mehdi Karoubi, wrote to President Hassan Rouhani on 11 January. A onetime presidential candidate now aged 79, Mehdi Karoubi has been under house arrest for the past nine years. The open letter referred to the admission by the Revolutionary Guards of responsibility for shooting down a Ukrainian plane on 8 January, killing all 176 people aboard. Addressing Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, the letter said: “As supreme commander of the armed forces, you are directly responsible for this disaster (…) You do not fulfil the constitutionally-defined criteria and conditions for being Supreme Leader.” 17.01.2020 – Hussein Karoubi arrested, father’s house arrest condition’s tightened Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the eight-year prison sentence received by Khosro Sadeghi Borjeni, a writer, journalist and member of the Tehran Association of Independent Journalists. A revolutionary court charged him in July 2018 with “meeting and conspiring against national security,” “insulting the Islamic Republic’s founder,” and anti-government propaganda, mainly for articles criticising economic policy and the living conditions of workers in Iran. Borjeni’s lawyer, who was notified of the sentence on 2 February, has 20 days to file an appeal. Contrary to the claims of regime officials, Mousavi and Rahnavard did not catch the virus from their daughters or because they violated social distancing rules. RSF has learned that, while one of their daughters does indeed also have Covid-19, she has had no direct physical contact with her parents for the past three weeks, and the other two daughters have tested negative. Mousavi and Rahnavard are cut from the world in their home and, for the most part, their only physical contact is with intelligence officials. ———- RSF_en Nader Fatourehchi, a freelance journalist who waged several campaigns against high-level corruption in the government and state agencies, reported on Twitter on 18 August that he has been sentenced to a year in prison, suspended for three years, on a charge of “stirring up public opinion against government institutions, officials and organizations.” Because they remain as a constant threat, suspended prison sentences are used as way to censor journalists.  Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the five-year prison sentenced that Kayvan Samimi Behbahani, the editor of the Iran Farda monthly, received in absentia from a Tehran revolutionary court on 20 April. Behbahani announced on his Telegram channel that he had discovered, “on the judicial institution’s news website that I was sentenced to five years in prison without being present in the court.” He also discovered that he was convicted as Iran Farda editor, for advocating in writing and in speeches for the release of prisoners of conscience, and for having created a political party 22 years ago, although the party never saw  the light of day. Many journalists, media workers and newspaper editors have protested. In an open letter to the president, Elias Hazrati, the managing editor of the newspaper Etemad and parliamentary representative for the city of Tehran, said “the economic crises affecting newspapers in recent years have resulted in many journalists and media workers being laid off” and he called for “the creation of technical and public health procedures that allow newspapers to continue publishing.” Hazrati himself had to lay off several Etemad journalists last week. ———–18.03.2020 – l’avocate Nasrin Sotoudeh en grève de la faim dans sa prisonNasrin Sotoudeh, avocate de plusieurs journalistes et lauréate en 2012 du Prix Sakharov “pour la liberté de l’esprit », a entamé une grève de la faim le 16 mars pour protester contre sa situation et celle des prisonniers politiques dans la prison d’Evin. Elle explique sa décision dans une déclaration « en cette période de crise et d’épidémie de coronavirus, la libération des prisonniers d’opinion, notamment des femmes détenues dans des dortoirs collectifs dans la prison d’Evin, est une nécessité nationale. (…) Du fait que toutes mes demandes de  libération des prisonniers sont restées sans réponse, je n’ai pas d’autre choix que la grève de la faim. » Emprisonnée depuis le 13 juin 2018, Nasrin Sotoudeh a été condamnée par le tribunal de la révolution de Téhéran à 33 ans de prison, dont une peine de sûreté de 12 ans, pour « incitation à la débauche », et à 148 coups de fouet.  RSF déjà a exprimé sa grande inquiétude pour la vie des  journalistes iraniens emprisonnés, qui sont en grand danger depuis que le coronavirus s’est propagé dans les prisons.———-17.03.2020 – Deux journalistes condamnés à trois ans de prison chacunLes journalistes-citoyens Zoreh Sarve et Sina Monirzadeh  ont été condamnés le 11 mars, la 26e chambre du  tribunal de la révolution de Téhéran, à une peine de trois ans de prison chacun, et à lire l’interprétation d’une sourate du Coran.  Ils devront ensuite collaborer activement avec les milices iraniennes pendant quatre mois. Reporters sans frontières (RSF) proteste fermement contre ces condamnations. Arrêtés le 23 décembre pendant le mouvement de protestation populaire,  les deux journalistes ont été accusés «d’insulte envers le fondateur du régime», de « propagande contre le régime » et de « réunions et de complot contre la sécurité nationale ». Tous deux  étaient très actifs sur les réseaux sociaux. Ils utilisaient des pseudos pour rester anonymes, mais ont été identifiés par la cyberpolice iranienne. Sina Monirzadeh est détenu à la prison d’Evin, et Zoreh Sarve à la prison pour femmes de Gharchak.———-11.02.2020 – Journalist sentenced to eight years in prison Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that Abdol Reza Davari, a journalist who was former President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s press adviser, was freed after a Tehran revolutionary court acquitted him of collaborating with AmadNews Telegram channel and website editor Rouhollah Zam, who was sentenced to death on 14 July. Davari had been held for a total of 135 days. Active on social media, he was first detained from May 2017 to September 2018, serving 15 months of a three-year jail sentence for “insulting” the Supreme Leader until it was overturned by the supreme court. He was arrested again in November 2019, a few hours after posting a tweet about the massive protests in Iran. 15.09.2020 – Member of independent journalists’ group jailed Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns independent journalist Khosro Sadeghi Borjeni’s arrest on 16 August and transfer to Evin prison on 9 September. A member of the Tehran Association of Independent Journalists, Borjeni was sentenced to a total of eight years in prison by a revolutionary court on 2 February on charges of “insulting the Islamic Republic’s founder,” “anti-government propaganda” and “meeting and conspiring against national and international security.” This was reduced to a total of seven years in prison on appeal in Tehran on 13 June. Under article 134 of the new Islamic Penal Code, according to which someone given several sentences serves only the main one, Borjeni will “only” serve a five-year sentence. He was arrested while travelling in the north-east of the country.———-26.08.2020 – Three journalists get prison sentences Reporters Without Borders condemns the arrests of two women journalists in the past few days, one of them a freelance reporter and the other a photographer and documentary filmmaker. to go further March 18, 2021 Find out more 23.07.2020 – Journalist acquitted and released ————Press freedom violations recounted in real time January (January -December 2018) News Mousavi and his wife have been deprived of all their rights ever since they were placed under house arrest in February 2011, at the same time as Mehdi Karoubi, a former parliamentary speaker and owner of Etemad Melli, a newspaper that has also been closed. Karoubi also has many health problems. RSF calls for the immediate release of all three. Arrested during a May Day demonstration organized by independent labour unions outside the Iranian parliament in 2019, Behbahani was released on bail seven weeks later. After a previous arrest in June 2009, he was sentenced in February 2010 to six years in prison on charges of “publishing false information with the aim of confusing public opinion” and “activities against national security.” He was finally released in May 2015. ————Press freedom violations recounted in real time (July-December 2010) ———- Photographer and documentary filmmaker Negar Masoudi was arrested on 1 November for photographing the disfigured faces of women who, in the regime’s eyes, were not “properly veiled” and were the victims of a wave of acid attacks in the central city of Isfahan in October 2014. Those who carried out the attacks were never identified and arrested. By photographing and exposing their disfigured faces, Masoudi provided the women with irrefutable evidence of the attacks so that they could sue the state, which they hold responsible.  Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns last weeks’ arrest of Hussein Karoubi, the former executive director of Etemad Meli, a newspapers closed at the behest of the authorities since 2009. Karoubi was arrested when he went to Tehran’s Evin prison on 14 January, a day after ministry of intelligence officials went to his home to arrest him so that he should serve the six-month jail sentence he received from a revolutionary court in March 2017. June 9, 2021 Find out more ————Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January -December 2016)  ———-17.06.2020 – Three journalists get jail terms ranging from 91 days to 7 years The cartoon showed a patient with two traditional healers. One wants to administer violet oil to him rectally. The other wants him to drink camel’s urine. In a photo on the wall in the centre, a mullah dressed as a doctor who resembles Ali Khamenei signals to him to say nothing. Prescribed in Islamic books, these two traditional remedies were recently proposed as cures for coronavirus patients. The ILNA issued a statement denying that it published the cartoon. Sharam Safari, the editor of a Telegram news channel called Rvejpress, was sentenced to 91 days in prison on 15 June by a court in the western city of Kermanshah, which tried him on charges of “publishing false information,” “defaming the clergy and the Koranic School of the Holy City of Qom” and “publishing figures for Covid-19 infections.” Qom was the site of one of the first Covid-19 outbreaks in Iran. Safari had been released on bail after being summoned by the Kermanshah police in late March in response to a complaint by the University of Medical Sciences over his publication of unofficial Covid-19 figures. Also on 11 October, student and citizen-journalist Roghieh (Ashraf) Nafari was returned to prison to serve a three-month sentence on a charge of “anti-government propaganda” for tweets that were rendered inaccessible after security police arrested her on 26 March. A Tehran revolutionary court originally gave her a four-month sentence, but it was reduced to three months on appeal. Two other journalists, one in the northeastern province of Golestan and the other in Kermanshah province, are being prosecuted for publishing allegedly false information about the coronavirus epidemic but have not been detained. One is Elaheh Ramezanpour, a journalist with the Hamshari daily newspaper, who is the target of two lawsuits by the University of Medical Sciences in Golestan province. The other is Sharam Safari, who edits a Telegram news channel called Arvejpress. He was released on bail of 60 million toman after being summoned by prosecutors.———— Receive email alerts Hadi Meharani, an activist and invalid from the 1980-88 war with Iraq who runs a Telegram news channel and edits a Twitter account entitled “Reformist Invalids,” was arrested at his home on 11 April. He is accused of “insulting religious officials and religious belief” for posting information about the spread of the coronavirus and criticizing the information provided by state radio and TV. He is being held in Tehran’s Evin prison, where he was transferred to the infirmary on 15 April.  ———-28.09.2020 – Soheil Arabi moved, placed in solitary, for denouncing prison conditions  Reporters Without Borders (RSF) reiterates its condemnation of the judicial harassment and arrests of Iranian writers and journalists, after three members of the Association of Iranian Writers, Reza Khandan Mahabadi, Baktash Abtin and Kayvan Bagen, were returned to prison on 26 September to serve sentences ranging from three and half to six years in jail. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that Amir Chamani, a journalist and workers’ rights defender who was arrested in the northwestern city of Tabriz on 2 April, was released on bail of 200 million toman (54,000 euros) on 19 May pending trial. He was arrested after being summoned by the FATA, the cyber-police, over several tweets about the health situation in Iran’s prisons and about protests by inmates in several prisons, including Tabriz prison. His computer and mobile phone were confiscated and his social media accounts have been blocked.  Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the systematic imposition of harsh jail sentences on journalists in Iran. Of the three latest victims, the longest sentence was given to Khosro Sadeghi Borjeni, a member of the Tehran Association of Independent Journalists, who was sentenced to a total of seven years in prison on appeal in Tehran on 13 June. A revolutionary court had sentenced him to a total of eight years in prison on 2 February for “insulting the Islamic Republic’s founder,” “anti-government propaganda” and “meeting and conspiring against national security.” Under article 134 of the new Islamic Penal Code, according to which someone given several sentences serves only the main one, Borjeni will “only” serve a five-year sentence. Soheil Arabi, an imprisoned journalist who was awarded the RSF Press Freedom Prize in 2017, has been severely punished for describing the appalling conditions in Greater Tehran Prison in a secretly recorded audio message broadcast by Voice of America’s Persian-language service on 11 September. As well as reporting the existence of a torture chamber in the prison, Arabi said hygiene was so bad that the food and water was not fit for human consumption, with the result that detainees had to pay to get edible food and disinfected water.  ———- 17.11.2020 – Mir Hossein Mousavi and Zahra Rahnavard have coronavirus  Although journalist and human rights defender Narges Mohammadi was released on 8 October after serving more than eight years of her prison sentence, women journalists and citizen-journalists continue to be jailed arbitrarily in Iran, where three have just been detained in the space of a week. A leading Iranian journalist, Samimi Behbahani was arrested during a demonstration organized by independent labour unions outside the Iranian parliament on 1 May 2019 and was released on bail on 17 June 2019 pending trial. After a previous arrest in June 2009, Behbahani was sentenced in February 2010 to six years in prison on charges of “publishing false information with the aim of confusing public opinion” and “activities against national security.” He was finally released in May 2015. A fourth journalist who was arrested with them, Ahmad Zahedi Langroudi, the editor of the provincial monthly GhilanOuja, is still being held in Gilan province’s Ziabar prison because his family was unable to raise the bail money.  ————-29.06.2020 – One-year jail term for editor of cultural weekly RSF has also learned that a Tehran revolutionary court sentenced Kayvan Samimi Behbahani, the editor of the monthly Iran Farda, to three years in prison on 13 June. Arrested during a May Day demonstration organized by independent labour unions outside the Iranian parliament on 1 May 2019, this distinguished journalist was released on bail seven weeks later. After a previous arrest in June 2009, Behbahani was sentenced in February 2010 to six years in prison on charges of “publishing false information with the aim of confusing public opinion” and “activities against national security.” He was finally released in May 2015. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the one-year prison sentence that a court in the northeastern province of Razavi Khorasan has passed on Ali Razaghi Bahar, the editor of the cultural weekly Barssava. As a result of a complaint by the Press Licensing and Surveillance Commission, the censorship arm of the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance, he was convicted of failing in his “supervisory responsibility” by publishing an article “promoting sexual freedom and alcohol consumption.” According to Bahar, who also edits magazines published by the Hamshahri group (owned by Tehran city hall), the commission never summoned him to hear his explanation. The latest victim is Mahmud Shariari, a former national radio and TV presenter now very active on social media. He was arrested by intelligence ministry officials in Tehran on 14 April on a charge “publishing false information about the coronavirus” after he posted a video seen by hundreds of thousands of Iranians that referred to a cover-up of information about the spread of the virus in early March. His criticism of the handling of the health crisis and the lockdown has clearly annoyed the authorities, who have not said where he is being held. After being summoned by the Sentence Executive Bureau of Tehran’s Evin prison, photojournalist Alieh Motalebzadeh was returned to prison on 11 October to begin serving a three-year prison sentence on a charge of “meeting and conspiring against national security.” Motalebzadeh, who is also a women’s rights activist and vice-president of Iran’s Association for the Defence of Press Freedom, received the sentence from a Tehran revolutionary court in August 2017 and was notified in October 2019 that an appeal court had confirmed it. Originally arrested in November2016, she was freed on bail of 300 million toman (270,000 euros) the following month pending trial. Chamanii was detained without any reason being given to him or his family. A decision to extend his detention was taken on 5 April, when he was transferred to a detention centre run by the intelligence department of the Revolutionary Guards. Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists News 14.05.2020 – A journalist jailed, an already jailed journalist hospitalized The Iranian authorities continue to jail journalists although Covid-19 is taking a heavy toll on the country’s prison population. Hassan Fathi, a 64-year-old journalist and documentary film maker, was taken to Tehran’s Evin prison on 7 May to serve an 18-month sentence for “confusing public opinion by spreading false information” in an interview for BBC Persian in 2011. His sentence was finally confirmed on appeal by a Tehran court. He was previously arrested twice over the same interview, first in 2011 and then in 2018.     News ————Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January-July 2010) ————Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January-December 2011) Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that Sepideh Moradi and Shima Entesari, two citizen-journalists who worked for the Sufi independent news website Majzooban Noor, were released on 9 February after serving two-year jail  sentences. Arrested in February 2018, the two women were initially given five-year jail terms, which were reduced to two years on appeal.———-  Journalists freed, others in great danger Under a decree issued by the head of the judicial system on 25 February, thousands of prisoners were either freed or granted conditional releases on the occasion of the Iranian New Year. They included a number of journalists and citizen-journalists, among them six people who worked for the Sufi news website, Majzooban Noor ­– Reza Entesari, Sina Entesari, Mohammad Reza Darvishi, Amir Nouri, Saleholldin Moradi and Massoude Kazemi. Four other Majzooban Noor journalists are still being held. The journalist Hengameh Shahidi has been released provisionally on medical grounds.  Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is concerned about the health of Mir Hossein Mousavi, a former prime minister and owner of the now closed newspaper Kalameh Sabaz, and Mousavi’s wife, the writer Zahra Rahnavard, who have been under house arrest for nearly ten years. According to the news website Kaleme, both have tested positive for Covid-19. The two septuagenarians also both have heart conditions and are suffering from the effects of their prolonged illegal detention. ————Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January-December 2012) Shabnam Ashaouri, the editor of Aghahinameh, an economic bi-monthly specializing in the working class, was arrested at her home on 4 October by Revolutionary Guard intelligence officers in plain-clothes after they searched her home. At least six other workers’ rights activists were arrested the same day, since when their families have been told nothing about the reason for their arrests or where they are being held. A week later, on 18 September, Arabi was taken to the prison director’s office, where he was interrogated and was told that, in reprisal for the recording, “we are going to send you to an even worse place than this one.” According to his imprisoned mother, Farangis Mazloom, who was herself sentenced to six years in prison on 14 July for “meeting and conspiring against national security” and “anti-government propaganda,” he has been transferred to Rajai-Shahr prison and has been placed in solitary confinement there. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has already condemned the judicial persecution of Arabi and the way the Iranian authorities harass the families of journalists. ———-14.10.2020 – Three women journalists arrested 06.04.2020 – Newspapers banned from being printed  The Covid-19 National Management Office (the government body set up to combat the coronavirus) and the press department of the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance have issued a communiqué announcing that “no newspapers will be printed until further notice.” Officially, this is to ensure respect for the government’s social distancing measures, because “the distribution of printed newspapers and magazines requires physical interaction between individuals, journalists, printers and distributers, and this interaction could potentially facilitate the spread of the virus.” This decision has prolonged the period during the New Year festivities (20 March to 2 April) when the press is traditionally not distributed. The communiqué urged newspapers to “use their capacity to publish online and on social networks in order to reinforce public information and advice about the coronavirus.” ————Press freedom violations recounted in real time ( January-December 2013) Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that the authorities have released three journalists who were arrested during a ceremony in Sowme’eh Sara, in the northern province of Gilan, on 26 December to pay tribute to a demonstrator killed during an anti-government protest the previous month. Jelveh Javaheri, Kaveh Mzadari and Forough Sameinia, who work for online media including Bidarzani (Women’s Awakening), were released on 14 and 16 January pending trial after payment of 100 million toman (27,000 euros) in bail. IranMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesOnline freedoms Covid19WomenImpunityInternetCitizen-journalistsPredatorsJudicial harassmentViolence 07.04.2020 – Journalists still being arrested during pandemic Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns journalist and workers’ rights defender Amir Chamanii’s arrest in the northwestern city of Tabriz on 2 April. His family said he was arrested after being summoned by the FTA, the cyber-police, a day after posting several tweets about the health situation in Iran’s prisons and about protests by inmates in several prisons, including Tabriz prison.  ———-  ———–01.10.2020 – Three members of the Association of Iranian Writers jailed 23.01.2020 – Three journalists released pending trial Follow the news on Iran ————Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January -December 2015) ————Press freedom violations recounted in real time ( January-December 2014) ————Press freedom violations recounted in real time (June-December 2009) These three writers and journalists were sentenced by a Tehran revolutionary court in May 2019 on charges of anti-government propaganda and illegally publishing an online newspaper on Facebook. Although confirmed by a Tehran appeal court, the sentences were suspended for four months because of the Covid-19 pandemic.  ———-10.02.2020 – Two citizen-journalists freed 27.01.2020 – Journalist questioned over allegedly false corruption claims on Twitter In a statement delivered outside Evin prison, the three writers and journalists said they were the victims of “false accusations” and had been convicted because they “fought against the censors and for freedom of expression.” The Association of Iranian Writers is Iran’s oldest civil society organization. Its activities were banned under the Shah and again under the Islamic Revolution. Two of its leaders, the writers and journalists Mohamad Makhtari and Mohamad Jafar Pouyandeh, were murdered in 1998. February 25, 2021 Find out more IranMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesOnline freedoms Covid19WomenImpunityInternetCitizen-journalistsPredatorsJudicial harassmentViolence Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders (RSF) reiterates its deep concern about the fate of imprisoned journalists in Iran, who have routinely been denied adequate medical care in the past and who are now in danger of dying from the coronavirus that is spreading in the prisons.———-27.04.2020 – Journalist held for insulting Ali Khamenei Amir Moradi, a poet and writer who is a member of the Association of Iranian Writers, was arrested at his home on 28 November by plainclothesmen who seized computers and manuscripts during a search of his home. After being charged with “activities against national security,” he was taken to Tehran’s Evin prison. He had been about to participate in a virtual solidarity event in support of free speech and to demand the release of three of the association’s members – Reza Khandan Mahabadi, Baktash Abtin and Kayvan Bagen – who were returned to prison on 26 September to begin serving sentences ranging from three and half to six years in jail that they had received in May 2019 on charges of anti-government propaganda and illegally publishing an online newspaper on Facebook. News Saide Ahmadi, who runs the Shareh Kam pavaeh news channel in Paveh, a town in the western province of KKurdistan, was arrested on 3 April on a charge of “publishing false information about the coronavirus” for posting unofficial estimates of the number of cases and deaths. His family still does not know where he is being held. November 17, 2020 – Updated on January 20, 2021 Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January -December 2020) Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 Mahmud Shariari, a former national radio and TV presenter detained since 14 April for “publishing false information about the coronavirus,” was transferred on 7 May from Evin prison to a section in Tehran’s Madaien Hospital that is reserved for coronavirus patients, his family says. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the arrests of Masoud Heydari, the news director of the Iranian Labour News Agency (ILNA), and Hamid Haghjoo, the manager of its Telegram channel. They were arrested in Tehran on 24 April for “insulting Islamic Republic Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei” in a cartoon published on ILNA’s Telegram channel. Heydari was released but Haghjoo is still being held. Former journalist and human rights defender Mehdi Mahmoudian was returned to prison on 1 December after being summoned by the media and culture court and charged with “publishing false information with the aim of upsetting public opinion.” The Revolutionary Guards had filed a complaint against him for criticizing them in tweets about the summons issued to five journalists with the official news agency IRNA in connection an interview with one of their commanders. This is the fourth time in a year that Mahmoudian has been arrested for the same reason. In 2009, he was sentenced to five years in prison on charges of anti-government propaganda and spreading false news.  Freelance reporter Mehrnoush Tafian was arrested when she was summoned before a revolutionary court in the southern city of Ahvaz on 29 October. She was arrested for failing to pay bail after being charged in connection with her coverage of a demonstration in early September by residents of a nearby village in protest against the destruction of their homes by Iran’s richest religious foundation. When she was originally arrested, Revolutionary Guard intelligence officers searched her home and confiscated journalistic material and personal effects. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns freelance journalist Pejman Mousavi’s interrogation by the Tehran prosecutor’s office yesterday for making allegedly false claims on Twitter about corruption in the distribution of newsprint by the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance. ———–15.04.2020 – Journalists arrested over coronavirus epidemic coverage Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the Iranian regime’s persecution of journalists and citizen-journalists who have published information about the coronavirus epidemic that lacked official approval.last_img read more