Peru: Two Soldiers Dead in Attack Attributed to Shining Path

first_imgBy Dialogo August 27, 2009 LIMA, 26 August 2009 (AFP) – At least two soldiers died on Wednesday in an attack on a military patrol in southeastern Peru by presumed members of the Maoist guerrilla group Shining Path (SL), the army announced. The patrol, from a counter-subversion base, was traveling along a road in the Andean region of the department of Huancavelica, 440 km southeast of Lima, when it was attacked by the Shining Path guerrillas, setting off a confrontation, according to the report. “The military patrol was ambushed,” AFP was told by a source from the Armed Forces Joint Command, who requested anonymity. The Defense Minister, Rafael Rey, told Lima broadcaster RPP that two soldiers were killed and “it is estimated that there were at least four deaths on the Shining Path side,” although this has not been confirmed. Rey said that the incident took place during “an action in pursuit of the terrorist Raúl and his people,” referring to Shining Path leader Jorge Quispe Palomino, known as “Comrade Raúl.” “The pursuit of this group continues,” Rey specified. This confrontation, the minister said, is part of the military strategy being carried out in the country in order to put an end to the groups classified as remnants of Shining Path. “It was evident that there was going to be (a confrontation), and there will be more in the future due to the application of this strategy,” he added. SL maintains active columns that are considered to be remnants of the organization, which was defeated military in the mid-1990s and the principal leaders of which are imprisoned. These columns, according to the intelligence services and analysts of political violence, are allied with bands of drug traffickers in two regions of the country: the valley of the Upper Huallaga, which extends northward from the central jungle, and the valley of the Ene and Apurímac Rivers, known as the VRAE, in the southeast of the country. Wednesday’s ambush occurred in the VRAE, a coca-growing region that is under a state of emergency and military control. At the beginning of August, three police and two women were killed in an SL attack on a police station in the town of San José de Secce. The deadliest attack this year took place on 9 April, when fifteen troops died in an ambush in the VRAE.last_img read more

Bolivian Drugs Pass through Paraguay En Route to Brazil and Argentina

first_img Bolivian drug traffickers use the border with Paraguay to transport drugs to Brazil and Argentina, declared César Guedes, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) representative in Bolivia. “Very few people would think that the drugs that reach Brazil or Argentina from Bolivia are going to pass over their borders. Paraguay is now being used to distract attention,” the international official told the newspaper La Razón. Guedes explained that criminals use this route because it is insufficiently controlled, enabling them to access the continent’s largest markets, and through them, Europe, with less risk. “Since it’s an inhospitable, rural border without paired cities (those separated only by the border line), the drug traffickers turn that area into an opportune location for carrying out extralegal activities,” he specified. “What we’re going to do, both with the country program for Bolivia and (with) the one for Paraguay, is to have greater ties of communication in order to promote greater cooperation on border control, within the United Nations framework,” the UNODC representative explained. Bolivia and Paraguay, which share a 700-kilometer border, have signed several anti-narcotics agreements to fight illicit activities on their territory. For their part, Bolivia and Brazil have made progress in strengthening the fight against drug trafficking along the extensive 3,100-kilometer border they share, by means of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), the use of radars, and even joint military exercises. In March of this year, the latter two countries signed an agreement for surveillance operations with UAVs, and signature is pending on an agreement to monitor and destroy excess coca crops. By Dialogo November 23, 2011last_img read more

Honduras Arrests Gang Leaders at Funeral

first_imgBy Dialogo June 06, 2012 Honduras police arrested 20 leaders of the feared Mara 18 gang on June 4 as they attended a funeral for one of their comrades, a security spokesman told AFP. “Citizens told the police that the leaders would be coming to a funeral for a comrade killed Saturday [June 2],” said Security Ministry spokesman Hector Ivan Mejia. He said police surrounded the funeral procession as the body was being laid to rest in the town of San Buenaventura, north of the capital. Media reported that some of the suspects escaped the cordon, leading police to chase them through the town as gunfire echoed through the streets. Mejia declined to provide further details about the operation, but said the 20 arrestees include neighborhood and district-level chieftains, some of whom had warrants out for their arrest. Turf wars waged by Central American drug cartels have given Honduras one of the highest homicide rates in the world.last_img read more

Colombian police thwart drug ‘mules’ who try to smuggle drugs on commercial flights

first_imgBy Dialogo October 29, 2014 “During the preliminary identification analysis, the substance tested positive for cocaine hydrochloride of a net weight of 45.85 pounds. The two women were immediately arrested and presented with charges of drug trafficking,” the police reported. In addition to hiding cocaine inside their luggage, some mules carry drugs wrapped in plastic in their stomach. This method is extremely dangerous for the mules, who could die if the wrapping ruptures. But a routine search of their luggage revealed that they weren’t typical passengers. Nearly 21 kilograms of white powder was hidden inside the false bottoms of their luggage, discovered by agents of the Colombian National Police. When they tested the powder, their suspicions were confirmed. The majority of drug smugglers get on flights destined for Central America, which has emerged as a popular transshipment point for narcotics. Some drug mules board planes which go to Europe, where the price of cocaine is higher than it is in the United States. As security forces in Colombia crack down on traditional drug trafficking routes, organized crime groups are increasingly trying to smuggle cocaine, heroin, and other illegal substances on commercial flights through the country’s airports. Narco-traffickers often use so-called “mules” – people who transport drugs by hiding them in their luggage or even ingesting them. Between January 1 and October 21, security agents at El Dorado International Airport arrested 227 drug trafficking suspects and seized 515 kilograms of cocaine, which had a street value of about $12.6 million (USD). “With the use of this strategy, traffickers try to fool the authorities into thinking that they are just harmless families traveling abroad,” Colombia’s Ministry of Defense reported in September. “They are people who do not generate suspicion.” In addition to hiding cocaine inside their luggage, some mules carry drugs wrapped in plastic in their stomach. This method is extremely dangerous for the mules, who could die if the wrapping ruptures. Between January 1 and October 21, security agents at El Dorado International Airport arrested 227 drug trafficking suspects and seized 515 kilograms of cocaine, which had a street value of about $12.6 million (USD). The majority of drug smugglers get on flights destined for Central America, which has emerged as a popular transshipment point for narcotics. Some drug mules board planes which go to Europe, where the price of cocaine is higher than it is in the United States. As security forces in Colombia crack down on traditional drug trafficking routes, organized crime groups are increasingly trying to smuggle cocaine, heroin, and other illegal substances on commercial flights through the country’s airports. Narco-traffickers often use so-called “mules” – people who transport drugs by hiding them in their luggage or even ingesting them. “With the use of this strategy, traffickers try to fool the authorities into thinking that they are just harmless families traveling abroad,” Colombia’s Ministry of Defense reported in September. “They are people who do not generate suspicion.” On October 20, Elena Beatriz García Ardila, 43, and her daughter Viviana García Ossa, 19, looked like ordinary travelers as they prepared to board a plane bound for Madrid at El Dorado International Airport in Bogotá. But a routine search of their luggage revealed that they weren’t typical passengers. Nearly 21 kilograms of white powder was hidden inside the false bottoms of their luggage, discovered by agents of the Colombian National Police. When they tested the powder, their suspicions were confirmed. Organized crime groups are employing a wide array of people to try to smuggle drugs. PNC agents have captured entire families, with young children, as they tried to sneak cocaine through the El Dorado International Airport. Security agents have also arrested older people, some who were in their 70s. Organized crime groups are employing a wide array of people to try to smuggle drugs. PNC agents have captured entire families, with young children, as they tried to sneak cocaine through the El Dorado International Airport. Security agents have also arrested older people, some who were in their 70s. On October 20, Elena Beatriz García Ardila, 43, and her daughter Viviana García Ossa, 19, looked like ordinary travelers as they prepared to board a plane bound for Madrid at El Dorado International Airport in Bogotá. “During the preliminary identification analysis, the substance tested positive for cocaine hydrochloride of a net weight of 45.85 pounds. The two women were immediately arrested and presented with charges of drug trafficking,” the police reported. Most of the suspected drug mules PNC agents have captured are Colombian. But security forces have also arrested alleged smugglers from other countries, including Mexico, Spain, Brazil, Australia, China, Chile, the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Venezuela, Italy, the Netherlands and even Finland. Most of the suspected drug mules PNC agents have captured are Colombian. But security forces have also arrested alleged smugglers from other countries, including Mexico, Spain, Brazil, Australia, China, Chile, the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Venezuela, Italy, the Netherlands and even Finland. This article is interesting, but I would suggest you also put in how long the sentence is for these crimes so that the people who try to do it,think twice Very good work, keep it uplast_img read more

Argentine Air Force Provides Humanitarian Aid to Peru

first_imgBy Eduardo Szklarz/Diálogo May 12, 2017 In the face of the worst natural disaster Peru has experienced in decades, the Argentine Air Force (FAA, per its Spanish acronym) sent a Hercules C-130 aircraft to assist victims. From March 21st–31st, the Peruvian Air Force assumed operational control of the aircraft belonging to the 1st Air Brigade of El Palomar. The aircraft did its work in the Andean nation in cooperation with the air forces of Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and the U.S. The aircraft transported 15 FAA troops divided into two crews (one with seven members and the other with eight) to conduct humanitarian work in areas hard to reach by land. It also transported nine volunteers from the Argentine White Helmets Commission specializing in water treatment and disaster response who provided assistance in tandem with the FAA. “It is very important for FAA to be able to pitch in during natural disasters like the one experienced by our sister nation, Peru,” FAA Vice Commodore and Hercules C-130 pilot Daniel Máspero told Diálogo. “The mudslide and floods affected the central and northern areas of the country, in particular, causing an enormous loss of human life and material damage,” he said. More than 800 Peruvian municipalities have declared a state of emergency. Figures from the National Emergency Operations Center (COEN, per its Spanish acronym) published in the March 20th issue of the newspaper El Comercio show that the storms and mudslides left 75 dead, claimed close to 100,000 other victims, and damaged 135,000 homes. According to the COEN’s estimates, the heavy rains lashing the country as a result of the El Niño phenomenon had a direct or indirect impact on a total of 626,298 people. Cargo and passenger transport The 15 service members who traveled to Peru on the Hercules C-130 worked practically around the clock to provide humanitarian assistance. Their specific mission was to transport cargo from Lima to Trujillo (Peru’s third largest city and one of the hardest hit by the storms), and to Chiclayo and other municipalities in northern Peru near the Ecuadoran border. On the return trip, the aircraft also evacuated victims to Lima. This crucial airlift brought relief to thousands of residents of the most flooded regions. “We transported 168,000 kilos of cargo, including food, sheets, and medicine,” Vice Cmdre. Máspero reported. “We have also evacuated between 530 and 540 people to Lima from northern Peru.” The Argentine White Helmets team, in turn, delivered 4,000 blankets and 40 boxes of water-purification tablets, enough to treat more than eight million liters of water, as reported by the Télam news agency on March 24th. International cooperation Vice Cmdre. Máspero stressed the importance of humanitarian aid missions in strengthening regional cooperation among different armed forces. “In this type of humanitarian work, you interact with members of other air forces in the same disaster area,” he said. “We were on call for the Peruvian Air Force, which drew up the daily flight plan for the work to be done in different regions and gave us all the support we needed to carry out the plans.” The Argentine service members cooperated with the air forces of Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and the United States, whose large aircraft shared the same flight plan. “The [Argentine] aircraft operated alongside other aircraft in the region within the framework of the System of Cooperation Among the American [Air] Forces, established to assist communities in areas where natural disasters have occurred,” the Argentine Ministry of Defense stated in an April 7th press release. Vice Cmdre. Máspero also highlighted the service members’ strong sense of solidarity with the people affected by the floods. “On a personal level, it is always an honor and a source of pride to participate in these types of missions with our call to service, knowing we can help people who need it, like those in Peru,” he said during an interview with Diálogo.last_img read more

U.S. and Paraguayan Special Forces Train Together

first_imgBy Julieta Pelcastre/Diálogo June 27, 2017 Que buenas noticias que las fuerzas especiales de Paraguay y EEUU se entrenen contra las nuevas amenazas emergentes en la region A 45-member contingent of the Paraguayan Joint Special Forces Battalion (BCFE, per its Spanish acronym) is participating in the Joint Combined Exchange Training (JCET), along with approximately 20 troops from the U.S. Army 20th Special Forces Group. They are seeking to improve their techniques and tactics in the fight against criminal organizations. “This exercise is focused on exchanging training techniques and knowledge on weapons. We aim to acquire new skills for the fulfillment of our missions, such as the fight against criminal groups that operate in the north of Paraguay,” Colonel Pablo Halaburda, the BCFE commander, told Diálogo. As part of the cooperation between the two countries, on May 12th the Paraguayan Senate authorized entry for the U.S. military unit, along with their corresponding equipment, arms, and munitions, for use during the JCET training program June 5th-July 3rd at BCFE facilities in the capital, Asunción. According to the military practice program, the squadrons experiment with new combat skills and techniques such as daytime and nighttime urban combat, communication, information gathering, riot control as well as planning and mutual improvement of military professionalism. “All the military practices are implemented based on information provided by qualified U.S. personnel. They are executed with our assets and high levels of strategy, intelligence, concentration, and adrenaline,” Paraguayan Army First Lieutenant Fabián Ayala, a BCFE member, told Diálogo. This is his third time participating in the JCET training. One part of the training program focuses on conducting rescue- and hostage-recovery exercises in realistic settings. The goal is to expand the participants’ range of capacities, to improve the precision and teamwork of the elite units to strengthen their intelligence operations against terrorism and drug trafficking. According to 1st Lt. Ayala, the constant, ongoing front-line training means that members of the detachment get to know each other better. “You have more trust in those who are at your side when you know that they have the same training; it gives you more of a sense of security for completing the mission.” Created in 2009, the BCFE contingent comprises Paraguayan Army, Navy, and Air Force personnel. They are highly trained in different operational areas, especially for fighting terrorists, drug trafficking, and any special situations, according to the Paraguayan Armed Forces Command website. Decision making “With this training, we can fulfill any mission assigned by the leadership. From so much training, so many spent cartridges and so many repetitions, you get muscle memory and a mental agility that helps you make decisions on the fly, fast, precise, and accurate,” 1st. Lt. Ayala stressed. In recent years, Paraguayan authorities have fought the Paraguayan People’s Army (EPP, per its Spanish acronym), the Armed Peasant Association, and other extremist groups engaged in kidnapping and extortion, as a means of financing their violent activity. The Paraguayan government has blamed EPP for several kidnappings and around 50 homicides since it was founded in 2008. According to the 2016 Global Terrorism Index, published by the Institute for Economics and Peace, Paraguay has the second highest level of terrorism in South America. The report measures the impact of terrorism in 163 countries in terms of deaths, injuries, and property damage. “Combating and eradicating criminal structures is an elemental necessity for national security, so the special forces work to keep up their operational level,” Col. Halaburda said. Since 2009, 160 BCFE members have been trained by highly skilled commandos from the United States military. The battalion also has a “multiplier” effect since they train other conventional units of the Paraguayan Armed Forces. “Anyone who attacks, kills, and abducts innocent people or breaks the law will be brought to justice, either the easy way or the hard way. We are trained and ready. They [EPP] will lose,” Col. Halaburda stressed. A company of the elite Paraguayan unit is strategically cooperating on the objectives outlined against asymmetrical threats in several districts in northern Paraguay, especially in the departments of Concepción and San Pedro, areas where EPP is active. Beyond training The cooperation between the two countries’ armed forces dates back decades. According to Col. Halaburda, Paraguayan military members and police officers have been trained in and outside the country by U.S. forces in courses like “Civilian Careers for Defense” and “Interagency Counterterrorism Coordination.” They also have been trained to face the jungle. “These courses are very important because they allow the two countries and their armed forces to strengthen their bonds of friendship and cooperation. The training allows our guest troops to familiarize themselves with the terrain, the language, and to get to know our armed forces better,” he said. “Not only do we fight utilizing maneuvers but we go beyond the training to show them our culture. Every training is a great experience,” added 1st Lt. Ayala. Paraguay is also working on strengthening their collaboration with Colombia. They are shoring up and promoting bilateral cooperation mechanisms in the security and defense sector, with an emphasis on the development of advanced military education and training, technical military projects, scientific cooperation, human rights, and cybersecurity. “It would be good if the number of combined joint training were increased to several times per year like it used to be in the different armed forces units. We are always open to training with our counterparts,” Col. Halaburda concluded.last_img read more

Stopp to lead Escambia/Santa Rosa Bar

first_imgStopp to lead Escambia/Santa Rosa Bar September 15, 2002 Regular News Stopp to lead Escambia/Santa Rosa BarThe Escambia/Santa Rosa Bar Association held its annual installation banquet installing Margaret T. Stopp as president and honoring William A. Swann, Jr., for his 50 years membership in The Florida Bar.Outgoing President Theodore W. Soule also presented Francisco M. Negron, Jr., with the 2002 President’s Award for his efforts as the chair of the ESRBA Law Week Committee.Soule also presented Donald H. Partington with the 2002 Community Service Award in recognition of his contributions to the Pensacola Opera.Chief Judge John P. Kuder installed Stopp as the 2002-03 ESRBA president. The other new officers include Kramer A. Litvak, vice president; C. Robert Hilliard, secretary; Francisco M. Negron, Jr., treasurer; Soule, immediate past president; and executive council members Charles F. Beall, Jr., G. R. Erick Mead, Lois Lepp Park, William H. Stafford III, Charles T. Wiggins, Susan A. Woolf, and Charles P. Young.last_img read more

Rule notifying clients when lawyers leave firms goes into effect today

first_img Jan 01, 2006 Joy A. Bruner Assistant Ethics Counsel Regular News The Ethics Hotline receives numerous inquiries regarding the proper procedures for notifying clients when firms dissolve and/or attorneys leave firms.There has not been a specific Rule of Professional Conduct addressing these issues. Rather, the Professional Ethics Committee has issued ethics opinions to provide guidance to Bar members.This changes as of January 1, 2006, when new Rule 4-5.8 goes into effect. The rule emphasizes that clients have the choice of counsel and that generally lawyers and law firms can do nothing to affect the client’s right to choose counsel. See 4-5.8(b).The new rule applies to all lawyers leaving firms or involved in a firm dissolution. This rule requires lawyers who are either dissolving a firm or leaving a firm to make a bona fide effort to negotiate a joint communication notifying clients of the change before the lawyers can unilaterally notify clients. Negotiations are to be with a designated lawyer or lawyers authorized by the firm to handle such negotiations.If negotiations for a joint communication are unsuccessful, a departing lawyer can unilaterally communicate with clients. However, the rule sets out information that must be included in the communication. A lawyer departing from a firm who unilaterally contacts clients must inform the clients that the lawyer is leaving the firm and “provide options to the clients to choose to remain a client of the law firm, to choose representation by the departing lawyer, or to choose representation by other lawyers or law firms.” Rule 4-5.8(d)(1).Similarly, in firms that are dissolving, if there is not a negotiated method of communication, lawyers in the firm may unilaterally contact clients to tell them of the firm’s dissolution. The communication must further “provide options to the clients to choose representation by any member of the dissolving law firm, or representation by other lawyers or law firms.” Rule 4-5.8(d)(2).In both cases, the communication must provide information to the client regarding any potential responsibility the client has for fees and costs already incurred. The notice must also discuss how any fee and/or costs deposits will be handled and, if appropriate, give notice to the client that a reasonable charge may be imposed for copying the file for a successor attorney. Rule 4-5.8(d)(3).The rule further provides for the scenario of a client who does not respond to the notice. If a client does not respond to notices informing the client that a lawyer is leaving a firm, the client is considered to remain a client of the firm until such time as the client gives notice otherwise. Rule 4-5.8(e)(1). In the case of a firm dissolution, a client who does not respond to notices of the dissolution is considered to be a client of the lawyer who had primary responsibility for the client’s matter until such time as the client indicates otherwise. Rule 4-5.8(e)(2).The rule makes clear that it is not attempting to create new legal obligations. Subsection (a) states: “The contract for legal services creates the legal relationships between the client and law firm and between the client and individual members of the law firm, including the ownership of the files maintained by the lawyer or law firm. Nothing in these rules creates or defines those relationships.”It is important to note that the rule makes no distinction between partners, shareholders, and associates. Prior to the enactment of Rule 4-5.8, Florida Ethics Opinion 84-1 stated that when an associate leaves a firm, the preferred method of notifying clients was for the firm and the associate to jointly send a letter to the affected clients informing them of the change and asking the clients to let the firm and the associate know who they wished to continue with their matters. If a joint letter could not be done, the opinion concluded that the associate could independently send a notification to the clients informing them of the associate’s departure and providing new contact information. However, the associate was not allowed to solicit the clients. The continuing validity of Opinion 84-1 will be considered by the Professional Ethics Committee at its January meeting.Questions regarding Rule 4-5.8 or any of the Rules of Professional Conduct may be directed to the Ethics Hotline at 800-235-8619. The Ethics Hotline is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. E-mail inquiries may be sent to eto@flabar.org. Rule notifying clients when lawyers leave firms goes into effect todaylast_img read more

Orange County’s Law Day activities win ABA award

first_imgOrange County’s Law Day activities win ABA award Orange County’s Law Day activities win ABA award Lori Spangler of the Orange/Osceola Public Defender’s Office and Lissa Bealke of the Construction Law Firm received the ABA’s 2005 Outstanding Law Day Activity Award.Orange County’s program was chosen because of its series of outreach programs to educate citizens on the rule of law. The PD’s office partnered with the Orange County Bar Association in 2005 for the Law Day activities. Spangler, chief of paralegal and secretary support services for the public defender’s office, co-chaired the Law Day activities with Lissa Bealke, senior paralegal for Construction Law Firm.The PD’s office collaborated and incorporated the theme “The American Jury: We the People in Action” by providing members of its office to stage Wolf v. Pig mock trials for elementary students, mentor middle school students attending law camp, and coach Oak Ridge High School students in the circuit mock trail competition. The public defender’s office also hosted mock DUI trials during the high school prom season.Orange/Osceola Public Defender Bob Wesley, a founder of the Orange County Law Camp, was proud of the team’s accomplishment.“A lot of thought, planning, and hard work was put into this outreach program,” Wesley said. “I’m thankful to our public defender employees who went into the community to help people understand how our legal system works. Congratulations to Lori and Lissa. They’re a real asset to our legal community.”Some of the other Orange County Bar Association Law Day activities included: poster and essay contests; mock trials; partnering with the University of Central Florida for a naturalization ceremony for 1,000 new citizens; partnering with Jury Services at the Orange County Courthouse to display children’s contest posters and read the children’s essays to potential jurors; Liberty Bell Award; and Law Day Luncheon. April 15, 2006 Regular Newslast_img read more

Out Of All The Horrible Oklahoma Tornado Stories, At Least There’s This

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A woman survived the Moore, Oklahoma tornado. She was recounting to a news reporter how she was hunkered down in the bathroom holding her dog (“I know he’s in here somewhere,” she said, pointing to the rubble that was once her home), when the tornado hit.And then this happened.last_img