Candler Park Music & Food Festival Announces 2019 Lineup: Dispatch, Greensky Bluegrass, More

first_imgCandler Park Music & Food Festival has released its 2019 lineup, featuring performances from Dispatch, Greensky Bluegrass, Dr. Dog, Trampled By Turtles, Stephen Marley, Larkin Poe, Funk You, Aqueous, and Webster.In addition to a stand-out lineup, the festival will also host a food village featuring fare from local vendors and food trucks, an artist market, adult field games, a craft cocktail bar, and the Terrapin Brew Lounge complete with an expanded selection of rare Terrapin craft brews.Related: PHOTOS: Candler Park 2018 Sees Standout Sets From Lettuce, Gov’t Mule, PettyGrass, & MoreCandler Park Music & Food Festival expects to draw 20,000 people to the Atlanta area for its 11th edition on May 31st and June 2nd. As festival producer and Rival Entertainment partner Josh Antenucci explained in a press release, “Year after year, our music bookings elevate the festival to new heights. A far cry from your usual neighborhood park event, Candler Park Music & Food Festival curates a perfect two day musical experience that blends local talent with trendsetting chart climbers and national headliners, all while maintaining that cherished community park vibe that got us started a decade ago.”You can get your tickets here, or head over to the festival’s website for more information.last_img read more

Web wizardry

first_imgThe observation became a question and finally an application.The observation: High school students are addicted to their mobile phones. The question: What if teaching tools were added to mobile phones? The application: “iGetIt Physics: Mechanics,” an iPhone tie-in for teaching high school physics, designed by Scott Crouch ’13 and Sophie Chang ’13 as a final project for the innovative course Computer Science 50.Crouch and Chang introduced “iGetIt Physics” during the second CS 50 Fair held on Dec. 8, a lively confab of techno wizardry that showcased more than 300 projects designed by the 380 students in Computer Science 50, otherwise known as “Introduction to Computer Science I.” The course, taught by David J. Malan ’99, Ph.D. ’07, a lecturer on computer science at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, aims not just to teach computer skills but to put students to work at solving real-life problems.The course’s final projects were displayed at the fair, which this year attracted more than 1,000 visitors, plus recruiters from companies such as Facebook, Google, and Microsoft. The displays were all the more intriguing because most of the presenters had little or no prior experience in computer programming.“What’s been really gratifying is to see these students who go from zero miles an hour to 80 over the course of just 12 weeks,” said Malan, who has taught CS 50 for three years. “We’ve had to adapt and be sensitive to different learning styles.”The fledgling coders were able to create a variety of applications, ranging from games to research tools to Web sites that tracked worldwide news or health conditions. Some students were inspired by other class requirements. James Winter ’11, an applied mathematics major with a keen interest in music, designed a beginning jazz arrangement Web site, an idea sparked by a homework assignment in a jazz harmony class. “I had to take a solo that was 64 bars long and write four-part harmony for every single note in it. Which took a long, long time. But now I can automate the process,” he said.Some students focused on applications for mobile devices, including the team of Crouch and Chang.With gusto, the pair showed off iGetIt Physics on their phones, scrolling with a flick of a finger through diagrams (all created especially for the application), equations, definitions, tutorials, and other material.“If you’re studying for a test and you want to review in the hallway, you open up our app,” Crouch explained.Crouch and Chang had little experience in programming or coding before taking CS 50. Yet they were able to create the application in the programming language Objective-C. “We knew nothing about Objective-C before we started,” Crouch said.They did, however, have a vision. “We love physics,” said Crouch. “We love iPhones.” Chang added, “Everyone is using iPhones or iTouches; it’s definitely useful.”So the pair decided to create a physics review/teaching application for the iPhone, vetting the diagrams and other information with a physics professor.“Physics is a big problem for high school students,” Crouch said. “The concepts are frankly confusing to most.  We thought we could help demystify them with this app. High school students are addicted to their cell phones. If they see physics is on it, they’re going to use it, they’re going to learn from it.”“Computer science, my own field, has become foundational. It can be found behind just about every aspect of research and discovery, from science to the humanities,” said Dean Michael D. Smith of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. “It is also increasingly a part of our everyday lives, although you rarely see the electronics and the programming behind our everyday devices. Thanks to David’s hard work, the CS 50 Fair allows students to experience the thrill of what is possible, and it gives them the opportunity to show off their ingenuity.”“David’s dedication to teaching is apparent, as students quickly become comfortable enough to take a ‘leap of faith’ and dig into something brand new and challenging. This is a metaphor for the ultimate aim of a Harvard education,” Smith added.Other applications presented at the fair were aimed at the Harvard community, including Web sites and text-message services that would help students navigate campus, find a movie, review the day’s dining hall menus, and even quit procrastinating.CS 50 classmates Chioma Madubata ’11, a molecular and cellular biology major, and Annie Ye ’11, a history major, first considered creating a Web site that would allow Harvard students to exchange language lessons. (I teach you French, you teach me Mandarin, for example.) But then the pair started thinking of the other services that college students would like to exchange, such as help during move in/move out, or textbooks, or even lessons. (I teach you guitar, you teach me tennis.)The result was their CS 50 Fair project “iTradeHarvard.com,” open to those with a Harvard e-mail address.“The key difference [from other fair projects] in iTradeHarvard is you don’t bid for things. You don’t exchange money. It’s a mutual exchange, it’s an online bartering system,” said Ye. “You pick what you’d like to offer and what you’d like to request, and [the Web site] will automatically match people up.”The pair’s ambitions had to be scaled back a bit. “It’s fun to think of the different things to exchange, but we had a deadline, and after a point we decided, ‘OK, this was long enough,’” said Madubata.Some fair projects were larks; others were intended for longtime implementation. For example, avid movie fans Luis Duarte ’13 and Keoni Correa ’13 created an improved design for the FDO Movie Club Web site; they have been talking with Harvard officials about adopting the design. Malan notes that Rover, an iPhone application that informs Harvard students of local events, news, and deals (http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/rover/), was created two years ago by CS 50 students.Crouch and Chang hope eventually to market their physics program through an iPhone apps store, with the download price of 99 cents — something any high school student could afford.The observation became a question and finally an application.The observation: High school students are addicted to their mobile phones. The question: What if teaching tools were added to mobile phones? The application: “iGetIt Physics: Mechanics,” an iPhone tie-in for teaching high school physics, designed by Scott Crouch ’13 and Sophie Chang ’13 as a final project for the innovative course Computer Science 50.Crouch and Chang introduced “iGetIt Physics” during the second CS 50 Fair held on Dec. 8, a lively confab of techno wizardry that showcased more than 300 projects designed by the 380 students in Computer Science 50, otherwise known as “Introduction to Computer Science I.” The course, taught by David J. Malan ’99, Ph.D. ’07, a lecturer on computer science at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, aims not just to teach computer skills but to put students to work at solving real-life problems.The course’s final projects were displayed at the fair, which this year attracted more than 1,000 visitors, plus recruiters from companies such as Facebook, Google, and Microsoft. The displays were all the more intriguing because most of the presenters had little or no prior experience in computer programming.“What’s been really gratifying is to see these students who go from zero miles an hour to 80 over the course of just 12 weeks,” said Malan, who has taught CS 50 for three years. “We’ve had to adapt and be sensitive to different learning styles.”The fledgling coders were able to create a variety of applications, ranging from games to research tools to Web sites that tracked worldwide news or health conditions. Some students were inspired by other class requirements. James Winter ’11, an applied mathematics major with a keen interest in music, designed a beginning jazz arrangement Web site, an idea sparked by a homework assignment in a jazz harmony class. “I had to take a solo that was 64 bars long and write four-part harmony for every single note in it. Which took a long, long time. But now I can automate the process,” he said.Some students focused on applications for mobile devices, including the team of Crouch and Chang.With gusto, the pair showed off iGetIt Physics on their phones, scrolling with a flick of a finger through diagrams (all created especially for the application), equations, definitions, tutorials, and other material.“If you’re studying for a test and you want to review in the hallway, you open up our app,” Crouch explained.Crouch and Chang had little experience in programming or coding before taking CS 50. Yet they were able to create the application in the programming language Objective-C. “We knew nothing about Objective-C before we started,” Crouch said.They did, however, have a vision. “We love physics,” said Crouch. “We love iPhones.” Chang added, “Everyone is using iPhones or iTouches; it’s definitely useful.”So the pair decided to create a physics review/teaching application for the iPhone, vetting the diagrams and other information with a physics professor.“Physics is a big problem for high school students,” Crouch said. “The concepts are frankly confusing to most.  We thought we could help demystify them with this app. High school students are addicted to their cell phones. If they see physics is on it, they’re going to use it, they’re going to learn from it.”“Computer science, my own field, has become foundational. It can be found behind just about every aspect of research and discovery, from science to the humanities,” said Dean Michael D. Smith of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. “It is also increasingly a part of our everyday lives, although you rarely see the electronics and the programming behind our everyday devices. Thanks to David’s hard work, the CS 50 Fair allows students to experience the thrill of what is possible, and it gives them the opportunity to show off their ingenuity.”“David’s dedication to teaching is apparent, as students quickly become comfortable enough to take a ‘leap of faith’ and dig into something brand new and challenging. This is a metaphor for the ultimate aim of a Harvard education,” Smith added.Other applications presented at the fair were aimed at the Harvard community, including Web sites and text-message services that would help students navigate campus, find a movie, review the day’s dining hall menus, and even quit procrastinating.CS 50 classmates Chioma Madubata ’11, a molecular and cellular biology major, and Annie Ye ’11, a history major, first considered creating a Web site that would allow Harvard students to exchange language lessons. (I teach you French, you teach me Mandarin, for example.) But then the pair started thinking of the other services that college students would like to exchange, such as help during move in/move out, or textbooks, or even lessons. (I teach you guitar, you teach me tennis.)The result was their CS 50 Fair project “iTradeHarvard.com,” open to those with a Harvard e-mail address.“The key difference [from other fair projects] in iTradeHarvard is you don’t bid for things. You don’t exchange money. It’s a mutual exchange, it’s an online bartering system,” said Ye. “You pick what you’d like to offer and what you’d like to request, and [the Web site] will automatically match people up.”The pair’s ambitions had to be scaled back a bit. “It’s fun to think of the different things to exchange, but we had a deadline, and after a point we decided, ‘OK, this was long enough,’” said Madubata.Some fair projects were larks; others were intended for longtime implementation. For example, avid movie fans Luis Duarte ’13 and Keoni Correa ’13 created an improved design for the FDO Movie Club Web site; they have been talking with Harvard officials about adopting the design. Malan notes that Rover, an iPhone application that informs Harvard students of local events, news, and deals, was created two years ago by CS 50 students.Crouch and Chang hope eventually to market their physics program through an iPhone apps store, with the download price of 99 cents — something any high school student could afford.last_img read more

Working, and riding, to end hunger

first_imgAccording to the Greater Boston Food Bank, 1 in 10 locals routinely don’t have enough to eat. In an effort to help address food inequality, Harvard began partnering with Food For Free, a Cambridge based nonprofit working to end chronic hunger by “recapturing fresh food that might otherwise be discarded” and ensuring that it finds its way to those who need it most.Through the partnership, Harvard donates approximately 2,000 nutritious meals each week to families in need. To ensure that breakfast, lunch, and dinner are available for every undergraduate student, Harvard University Dining Services regularly purchases more food than is actually consumed. In the past, excess fresh food was composted. Instead, now the untouched, surplus food is donated to Food for Free, which delivers it to local families.For the second year in a row, a group of riders from across Harvard will be participating in the annual Ride for Food on Sunday, Sept. 24. If you have an interest in joining their ride (either the 10, 25, or 50 mile course), or even just contributing to the cause, please contact Harvard University Dining Service’s Crista Martin at crista_martin@harvard.edu, or 617-496-6705. There is a $75 registration fee, and a request that you raise a minimum of $250 dollars in donations.You can also donate directly to one of the Harvard or Food For Free riders by visiting HERE.  (Be sure to click the Food For Free team.)last_img read more

Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame continue to respond to ‘The Hunting Ground’

first_imgTags: Green Dot Program, Kirby Dick, sexual assault, The Hunting Ground After screening “The Hunting Ground,” a documentary that highlights sexual assault on college campuses across the country, at both Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s last spring, conversations about sexual assault have continued and sparked action.Kirby Dick, director of the documentary, said he has been impressed with the way both schools have responded to the film.Lucy Du “I have been very impressed with the way Saint Mary’s and President [Carol Ann] Mooney have had multiple screens of the film and invited the film’s subjects, Annie Clark and Andrea Pino, to speak at the school,” Dick said.“We made this film not only to promote national awareness, but to give individual schools a tool to help undertake reform, and Saint Mary’s has courageously utilized the film to help initiate the reform process,” he said. “I also applaud Notre Dame’s choice to screen the film on multiple occasions, and to not react defensively, as so many schools around the country have in the past.”Dick said students are the key to keeping this conversation alive and eventually ending sexual assault on campus, but administrators must also take an active role.“More than any film, any committee, any report, student survivors and activists are the key to a school successfully confronting this issue,” Dick said.  “It may not be the most comfortable thing to do, but if presidents, deans and boards of directors meet regularly with and listen to the experiences, concerns and recommendations of survivors and activists, they will come away with a much deeper understanding of the school’s problems and potential solutions.“I know President Mooney has done this and I am hopeful that Father Jenkins, if he hasn’t already, will avail himself of this uniquely important opportunity.”Dick said the choice to include Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame in the documentary came after investigating hundreds of stories of sexual assault on campuses across the country over a nearly two-year period.“Nearly everyone was so powerful that it alone could have been the basis for a feature length documentary,” Dick said. “Rachel’s story, about a young woman who was deeply involved in the rich religious tradition of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, is profoundly heartbreaking and was included because it raises important questions about what happens when an institution does not live up to the values it espouses.“Lizzy Seeberg’s story, about her assault and subsequent suicide, was included because it conveys not only how traumatic an assault can be, but how the wrong response from an institution can impact a survivor even more than the assault itself. Her story shows how, in many cases, these are truly life and death issues.”Saint Mary’s director of media relations Gwen O’Brien said the documentary struck a chord with students and the College has responded.In addition to receiving the Notre Dame crime alerts, Saint Mary’s students have been invited to join Mooney’s Presidential Task Force.“The sexual assault of college women and men is an injustice, and institutions must take great care to not further injure the survivor,” O’Brien said. “The President looks forward to what the Task Force brings forth as ideas for change.”O’Brien said the Presidential Task Force, made up of students, faculty and staff, will examine the issue of sexual assault and look for potential problems with how the College responds to reports and survivor needs. By May, a report will be issued of their findings and action items.Collective voices create change, she said.“Dialogue has always been an important aspect of a Saint Mary’s education and listening to each other can only bring clarity,” O’Brien said. “President Mooney’s administration, the Belles Against Violence Office (BAVO) [and] other offices on campus work hard every day to support students who have experienced sexual assault move through the process of reporting and healing.”The most noticeable change on Saint Mary’s campus so far are the stickers on mirrors throughout campus aimed at simplifying the process of who to turn to if a student survives a sexual assault, she said.The gender and women’s studies department (GWS) is hosting Andrea Pino and Annie Clark, who were featured in “The Hunting Ground.” Clark and Pino will be speaking at Saint Mary’s tonight at 7 p.m. in Carroll Auditorium. Stacy Davis, chair of the GWS department, said after “The Hunting Ground” screening in April, students increased their efforts to assist survivors of sexual assault and decrease the number of assaults. It’s important for students interested in activism around the issue of sexual assault to attend the talk tonight, she said.“Because Andrea Pino and Annie Clark were also student activists, our students can learn from their stories and receive added inspiration for their own work,” Davis said. “Students will hear about how their peers at other schools have successfully used Title IX complaints to improve campus climate and make the judicial process more equitable.”Davis said Pino and Clark will speak about “Everyday Activism,” a term they have coined in establishing their non-profit organization End Rape on Campus.“‘Everyday Activism’ encourages people to do the seemingly small things that can facilitate a survivor’s recovery, such as being there to listen or taking notes for someone who needs to be away from their class on a particular day,” Davis said. “It also includes working to improve campus climate and culture through engagement with organizations such as Belles Against Violence and participation in the Green Dot program.”Editor’s Note: Associate Saint Mary’s Editor Alex Winegar contributed to this report.last_img read more

Wanna Win Big on Tony Night? Play the Broadway.com Photo Scavenger Hunt!

first_img View Comments About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home. Grab your phone and your remote—it’s time to play the Broadway.com Tony Awards Scavenger Hunt! When you see these 12 items pop up during the Tony telecast, snap a photo of your TV screen and tweet it with the hashtag #TonyHunt. If Tony host Alan Cumming struts on stage in a Mohawk, snap a photo! If a crew of sailors dance across the stage in tight white pants, snap a photo! If all of the Best Actor in a Musical nominees sing “Sugar Daddy” dressed as Hedwig (hey, it could happen), snap a photo! We’ll be retweeting the silliest, craziest and best shots all night on Twitter, and we’ll post our favorites on Broadway.com. Click below to print out our ultra-collectable Scavenger Hunt checklist by Broadway.com resident artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson and pass them out to play with your friends (or stuffed animals) on Sunday. Ready, set…tweet!center_img CLICK TO PRINTlast_img read more

Northfield Savings Bank donates $100,000 for disaster relief

first_imgNorthfield Savings Bank,In the wake of Tropical Storm Irene which affected much of central and southern Vermont, and resulted in the worst flooding in a generation, Northfield Savings Bank today made a $100,000 donation to the Green Mountain United Way for immediate disaster relief. The presentation of funds was held at the bank’s Waterbury, VT branch at 29 South Main Street. The location was significant, as floods had destroyed this branch earlier in the week. “Northfield Savings Bank was founded on the principle of Vermonters helping Vermonters,” said Thomas N. Pelletier, President and CEO of Northfield Savings Bank. “More than seven generations later, this remains a central part of our mission.  This money will be put to immediate use to help Vermonters recover from the ravages of Tropical Storm Irene.” Green Mountain United Way will be the administrative agent for the funds.  Funds will be distributed to community-based organizations in central Vermont that are providing immediate assistance to those in need.  The intention is to help community organizations facilitate the delivery of basic human needs; food, clothing and shelter.  Individuals in need of assistance should call VT 211 in order to be directed to the appropriate community organizations. Bank president, Thomas Pelletier presented the check to Nancy Zorn, executive director of Green Mountain United Way. Community-based organizations are encouraged to contact the Green Mountain United Way to access funding by calling (802) 229-9532, or visiting www.gmunitedway.org(link is external).About Northfield Savings BankNorthfield Savings Bank was founded in Northfield, Vt., in 1867 by a schoolmaster and haberdasher who believed a local community bank was needed. More than seven generations later, the Bank continues this community-minded tradition, and has grown to become the second largest bank headquartered in Vermont with assets of over $650 million. Also known for its role as a corporate citizen, Northfield Savings Bank proudly donates 10% of profits to Vermont community organizations, which totaled $420,000 in 2010. Northfield Savings Bank operates 13 branches throughout central Vermont and Chittenden County. Member FDIC. About Green Mountain United WayGreen Mountain United Way assesses the local area’s strengths and weaknesses and collaborates with other organizations, government agencies, faith-based groups, businesses and individuals to make the community a better place for all people.  GMUW’s priority areas are in financial stability, healthy living, early learning and basic needs. For more information go to www.gmunitedway.org(link is external). NORTHFIELD, VT (September 2, 2011)’last_img read more

U.S. and Paraguayan Special Forces Train Together

first_imgBy Julieta Pelcastre/Diálogo June 27, 2017 Que buenas noticias que las fuerzas especiales de Paraguay y EEUU se entrenen contra las nuevas amenazas emergentes en la region A 45-member contingent of the Paraguayan Joint Special Forces Battalion (BCFE, per its Spanish acronym) is participating in the Joint Combined Exchange Training (JCET), along with approximately 20 troops from the U.S. Army 20th Special Forces Group. They are seeking to improve their techniques and tactics in the fight against criminal organizations. “This exercise is focused on exchanging training techniques and knowledge on weapons. We aim to acquire new skills for the fulfillment of our missions, such as the fight against criminal groups that operate in the north of Paraguay,” Colonel Pablo Halaburda, the BCFE commander, told Diálogo. As part of the cooperation between the two countries, on May 12th the Paraguayan Senate authorized entry for the U.S. military unit, along with their corresponding equipment, arms, and munitions, for use during the JCET training program June 5th-July 3rd at BCFE facilities in the capital, Asunción. According to the military practice program, the squadrons experiment with new combat skills and techniques such as daytime and nighttime urban combat, communication, information gathering, riot control as well as planning and mutual improvement of military professionalism. “All the military practices are implemented based on information provided by qualified U.S. personnel. They are executed with our assets and high levels of strategy, intelligence, concentration, and adrenaline,” Paraguayan Army First Lieutenant Fabián Ayala, a BCFE member, told Diálogo. This is his third time participating in the JCET training. One part of the training program focuses on conducting rescue- and hostage-recovery exercises in realistic settings. The goal is to expand the participants’ range of capacities, to improve the precision and teamwork of the elite units to strengthen their intelligence operations against terrorism and drug trafficking. According to 1st Lt. Ayala, the constant, ongoing front-line training means that members of the detachment get to know each other better. “You have more trust in those who are at your side when you know that they have the same training; it gives you more of a sense of security for completing the mission.” Created in 2009, the BCFE contingent comprises Paraguayan Army, Navy, and Air Force personnel. They are highly trained in different operational areas, especially for fighting terrorists, drug trafficking, and any special situations, according to the Paraguayan Armed Forces Command website. Decision making “With this training, we can fulfill any mission assigned by the leadership. From so much training, so many spent cartridges and so many repetitions, you get muscle memory and a mental agility that helps you make decisions on the fly, fast, precise, and accurate,” 1st. Lt. Ayala stressed. In recent years, Paraguayan authorities have fought the Paraguayan People’s Army (EPP, per its Spanish acronym), the Armed Peasant Association, and other extremist groups engaged in kidnapping and extortion, as a means of financing their violent activity. The Paraguayan government has blamed EPP for several kidnappings and around 50 homicides since it was founded in 2008. According to the 2016 Global Terrorism Index, published by the Institute for Economics and Peace, Paraguay has the second highest level of terrorism in South America. The report measures the impact of terrorism in 163 countries in terms of deaths, injuries, and property damage. “Combating and eradicating criminal structures is an elemental necessity for national security, so the special forces work to keep up their operational level,” Col. Halaburda said. Since 2009, 160 BCFE members have been trained by highly skilled commandos from the United States military. The battalion also has a “multiplier” effect since they train other conventional units of the Paraguayan Armed Forces. “Anyone who attacks, kills, and abducts innocent people or breaks the law will be brought to justice, either the easy way or the hard way. We are trained and ready. They [EPP] will lose,” Col. Halaburda stressed. A company of the elite Paraguayan unit is strategically cooperating on the objectives outlined against asymmetrical threats in several districts in northern Paraguay, especially in the departments of Concepción and San Pedro, areas where EPP is active. Beyond training The cooperation between the two countries’ armed forces dates back decades. According to Col. Halaburda, Paraguayan military members and police officers have been trained in and outside the country by U.S. forces in courses like “Civilian Careers for Defense” and “Interagency Counterterrorism Coordination.” They also have been trained to face the jungle. “These courses are very important because they allow the two countries and their armed forces to strengthen their bonds of friendship and cooperation. The training allows our guest troops to familiarize themselves with the terrain, the language, and to get to know our armed forces better,” he said. “Not only do we fight utilizing maneuvers but we go beyond the training to show them our culture. Every training is a great experience,” added 1st Lt. Ayala. Paraguay is also working on strengthening their collaboration with Colombia. They are shoring up and promoting bilateral cooperation mechanisms in the security and defense sector, with an emphasis on the development of advanced military education and training, technical military projects, scientific cooperation, human rights, and cybersecurity. “It would be good if the number of combined joint training were increased to several times per year like it used to be in the different armed forces units. We are always open to training with our counterparts,” Col. Halaburda concluded.last_img read more

Orange County’s Law Day activities win ABA award

first_imgOrange County’s Law Day activities win ABA award Orange County’s Law Day activities win ABA award Lori Spangler of the Orange/Osceola Public Defender’s Office and Lissa Bealke of the Construction Law Firm received the ABA’s 2005 Outstanding Law Day Activity Award.Orange County’s program was chosen because of its series of outreach programs to educate citizens on the rule of law. The PD’s office partnered with the Orange County Bar Association in 2005 for the Law Day activities. Spangler, chief of paralegal and secretary support services for the public defender’s office, co-chaired the Law Day activities with Lissa Bealke, senior paralegal for Construction Law Firm.The PD’s office collaborated and incorporated the theme “The American Jury: We the People in Action” by providing members of its office to stage Wolf v. Pig mock trials for elementary students, mentor middle school students attending law camp, and coach Oak Ridge High School students in the circuit mock trail competition. The public defender’s office also hosted mock DUI trials during the high school prom season.Orange/Osceola Public Defender Bob Wesley, a founder of the Orange County Law Camp, was proud of the team’s accomplishment.“A lot of thought, planning, and hard work was put into this outreach program,” Wesley said. “I’m thankful to our public defender employees who went into the community to help people understand how our legal system works. Congratulations to Lori and Lissa. They’re a real asset to our legal community.”Some of the other Orange County Bar Association Law Day activities included: poster and essay contests; mock trials; partnering with the University of Central Florida for a naturalization ceremony for 1,000 new citizens; partnering with Jury Services at the Orange County Courthouse to display children’s contest posters and read the children’s essays to potential jurors; Liberty Bell Award; and Law Day Luncheon. April 15, 2006 Regular Newslast_img read more

Consumer perception doesn’t have to be reality

first_imgConsumer perception is an important driver of growth in any business, but especially in the financial services industry. This is both good and bad.On the one hand, according to the year-end figures published by the Credit Union National Association (CUNA), credit union membership grew 4% in 2015, due in large part to the positive perception of the credit union value proposition.On the other hand, the lingering perception that credit unions have sparse surcharge-free ATM access — and many fewer ATMs than banks — has limited their growth.While consumers like the idea of joining credit unions for such benefits as favorable interest rates on savings, at the end of the day, they want convenience. When people need cash, they don’t want to drive 50 miles — or even 10 miles — for the nearest surcharge-free ATM in their network. But, as market research has shown, many consumers believe that joining a credit union will mean they have to do just that.Fortunately, perception doesn’t have to be reality.Expanding your ATM network is as easy as aligning your credit union with the right EFT network provider. By joining the right EFT network, you can offer your members the same broad, ATM access they can get from the big banks, without the usual, associated negative issues. In addition, the right network provider can provide added benefit, such as ATM Fleet Management, which helps offload the time-intensive burden of coordinating multiple vendors, keeping up with regulatory and industry changes (like the transition to EMV) and large capital investment.Working with the right EFT network gives your credit union access to cutting-edge services, such as a mobile app that helps members easily locate surcharge-free ATMs.Ultimately, by working with the right ATM network provider, your credit union will not only expand its footprint, but also become more enticing to consumers. And, by offloading ATM management to a trusted network partner, you can refocus your energies on helping members see how working with your credit union is both convenient and cost-effective.The number of ATMs worldwide is expected to grow by more than 25%, from 2.6 million at the end of 2013, to approximately 3.3 million by 2017, according to the Mercator Advisory Group — even as mobile technology usage grows. To keep up with industry trends, ensuring that your ATM footprint expands, is only going to become more important as time goes on. 16SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Joe Woods Joe Woods, CUDE is a 15-year credit union veteran.  He has spent time with Corporate One FCU, Liberty Enterprises, co-founded Legacy Member Services and was part of the senior management … Web: www.dolphindebit.com Detailslast_img read more

The death of the branch: A lesson about credit union data

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The way we think about credit union data these days doesn’t mesh with what’s actually happening in the industry. Credit unions now have access to more data than they ever have. Failure to leverage that data though? That’s where you should be concerned.Let’s walk through an example: just over 20 years ago, Amazon entered the book retail market. Their mission was simple: deliver personalized experiences to its customers and make each interaction unique and customized to the individual.At the time, Amazon was just one man, Jeff Bezos, selling books out of his home. For the book market retail giants, Amazon was hardly a threat, just some crazy guy trying to compete with very large and long-established institutions. Companies such as Barnes and Noble and Borders Books had well over a thousand retail locations and were selling books hand over fist.Well, we all know how that story ends—Amazon is one of the top retailers in the world and Borders Books is now bankrupt and Barnes and Noble is struggling.last_img read more