Category: oswir

Province and ICBC announce increased treatment for people injured in motor vehicleProvince and ICBC announce increased treatment for people injured in motor vehicle


first_imgVANCOUVER, B.C. – The B.C. government and ICBC announce new regulations for the treatment of people injured in motor vehicle accidents.The province says these changes create a care-based car insurance system in B.C. that will provide increased care. New regulations, coming into effect April 1, 2019, will increase ICBC accident benefits for anyone injured in a crash regardless of fault. Customers will also have access to an expanded list of treatment providers, and updated treatment fees.Christine Bradstock, CEO for PABC says this announcement is positive news. “Working together with ICBC, we see this announcement as positive news for people injured in a motor vehicle accident, as they will have access to enhanced physiotherapy coverage. This is also excellent news for physiotherapists that treat ICBC patients as it allows for early intervention and increased treatment time for patients.”The regulations include updated treatment fees and types of treatments covered by ICBC for both new and existing claims. They also define a minor injury as it relates to payouts for pain and suffering, building on the legislated definition.Treatment protocol guidelines for examination, assessment, diagnosis and treatment of minor injuries to provide more consistent care for people injured in a crash are also included in these changes.For more information on this announcement, you can visit http://www.bcphysio.org/last_img read more


Laayoune Attorney General informs WGAD on legal rights of prisoners inLaayoune Attorney General informs WGAD on legal rights of prisoners in


first_imgLaayoune – The Attorney General of the King at the Court of Appeal in Laayoune, Abdelkarim Chafai informed the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention (WGAD) on the legal and human rights approach, and the legal rights granted to any prisoner in Morocco.After his meeting with the WGAD which is on a visit to the Kingdom at the invitation of the Moroccan government, Mr. Chafai told the press that he discussed with the members of the delegation the legal and human rights approach as well as the grantees granted to persons held in police custody, including the right to remain silent, to inform their families, legal assistance and the right to contact a lawyer.This meeting was also an opportunity to discuss the issue of guarantees of a fair trial as defined by the criminal proceedings in accordance with international agreements, he added, noting that the new Constitution of 2011 emphasizes the primacy of international treaties over domestic law of the country. The visit of the UN group in Morocco (December 9-18) is part of the openness process of the Kingdom, and its interaction with the mechanisms of the UN system of human rights and its irreversible strategic choice on the matter.last_img read more


Three men found guilty of contempt at UNbacked Sierra Leone war crimesThree men found guilty of contempt at UNbacked Sierra Leone war crimes


The United Nations-backed court set up to try suspects indicted for war crimes in Sierra Leone today found three senior members of the country’s former Armed Forces Revolutionary Council guilty of contempt for tampering with a former prosecution witness.Santigie Borbor Kanu (aka Five-Five) and Hassan Papa Bangura (aka Bomblast) were each found guilty on two counts of interfering with the administration of justice by offering a bribe to a witness, and for otherwise attempting to induce a witness to recant (or to state that he testified falsely) testimony he gave before the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL).Ibrahim Bazzy Kamara was convicted for attempting to induce a witness to recant his testimony, the court stated in a news release. He was found not guilty on a second count, of offering a bribe to a witness. Mr. Kamara was also convicted on a third count of knowingly violating a court order protecting the identity of a witness who had testified against him in the AFRC trial.Mr. Kamara and Mr. Kanu are currently serving sentences of 45 and 50 years, respectively, on convictions for war crimes and crimes against humanity. A fourth accused, Samuel Kargbo (aka Sammy Ragga), pleaded guilty at his initial appearance in July 2011 and was convicted on both counts. He subsequently testified for the prosecution. Mr. Kargbo remains free on bail on his own recognizance pending sentencing. Based in Sierra Leone’s capital, Freetown, the court was set up in 2002 to try those most responsible for serious violations of international humanitarian law in the civil wars that plagued the country, starting in 1996. read more


Croatia through with 4 points after a magnificent matchCroatia through with 4 points after a magnificent match


croatiaeuro 2014handballSweden ← Previous Story Poland qualifies for the Main Round! Next Story → Allez! Les Experts 100% at the Euro after a routine win Convincing Croatia wins narrowly in a clash against Sweden, to secure four points for the Main round. It was tough to call a favorite on this one, as the result was close; within 2 goals for the most part of the match, with 25-24 being the final score. The Olympic vice-champions were boosted by the ‘Yellow Sea’ (as labeled by Tom Ó Brannagáin), as Swedish fans were crowding the BrondbyHallen. Their idols thanked them with a two-goal lead just 3 minutes before the half time, but 7 turnovers made in the first half proved too much for Croatia to miss out on. The last minutes of the match saw Croatia with the narrow lead as both Johan Sjostrand (14 saves, 38%) and MirkoAliliović(6 key saves) did well for their teams when it counted the most. STATISTICSIn the first 8 minutes of the match it was DomagojDuvnjak against Sweden, as Croatian star was 3/3 from the field at 3:2.Croatia was better in converting chances into goals, with accuracy just under 50 percent (10/23, 43%) in the first half. It was the line-player position where the coaching duo Ola Lindgren and Staffan Olsson decided to strike the opponent, as Nilssonscored two, while creating chances, sneaking behind the back of Gojun. Sweden had a spell of good play between 10th and 20th minute, as the outscored Croatia 6:4, but the lead was short-lived, as Alilovićagain prevented goals from Petersen and Ekdahl Du Rietz, allowing Ćupića fast-break goal to take the lead. Half time ended with a relatively low score for both teams, at 10-9 in Croatian favor.Sweden got back on level terms right from the start of the second half with a goal from Ekberg.Sjostrandwho replaced Andersson on goal earlier, did vey well to keep the notorious Croatian wingers quiet from all areas. Sjostrand magnificently parried Štrlek’s fast-break effort, just as Ekberg tied to 16:16. The 50th minute was key to the match, as Croatia gets a two-goal lead through Štrlekwho scored from the fast break. Difference was back to one, after time-out from Sweden, as they wasted no time chasing the game, but Sweden fans might feel it was of no avail, as it was the closest they could get before conceding again. The score went to +3 at 20:18with an effort from the amazing Buntić scoring 6/7 overall.Swedish left backKarasson’s 5th goal of the match, brought Sweden within a chance, but the effort was swiftly answered by Buntićwith his 5th goal of the match, 5 minutes until the end, at 22:19.It was Karrasson again under the spotlight, with two minutes until the end, but for all the wrong reasons, as he puts his hand out, to prevent Bićanić from scoring a clear-cut chance, earning himself an early bath.Horvat set 25:23 from the fast break, followed by a consolation goal from Nielsen, who forcefully smashed the ball in the top-right, to relieve the frustration of loosing 25:24. TEXT: NEMANJA SAVIC read more


How photography works at the Super BowlHow photography works at the Super Bowl


first_imgThe people at Sports Illustrated know a thing or two about sports photography, so when they put out a video explaining how photographs are taken and processed at the Super Bowl, I stop and watch. Previously we’ve talked about the experience of pro sports photography, but that was nothing compared to what these guys are doing.The photographers are taking multiple shots a second and then handing memory cards to runners whose job it is to get them the photo processing team. Those guys have computers that process 11,000 shots an hour, where a normal, puny rig can handle just a thousand or so. A team of two people process an incredible 35,000-40,000 images during the event, entirely on-site.AdChoices广告The amount of tech talk is limited to the numbers above, and past that it’s mainly just photographers talking about their jobs and what makes a great photo. It’s a bit sappy, but it’s an interesting enough look at another aspect of the (and every) big game.via fstopperslast_img read more


Family statement says Ibrahim Halawa moved to prison hospitalFamily statement says Ibrahim Halawa moved to prison hospital


first_img Ibrahim in prison Image: Somaia Halawa Source: Paul Murphy/Twitter Ibrahim in prison 176 Comments 32,162 Views By Sean Murray http://jrnl.ie/3255604 Image: Somaia Halawa Earlier this month, the Irish national had his trial delayed for the 19th time. In January, Minister for Foreign Affairs Charlie Flanagan said that “substantial resources” were being used by the government in an attempt to secure Halawa’s release.Read: Ibrahim Halawa’s trial has been delayed for a 19th timeRead: Charlie Flanagan says ‘substantial resources’ are being deployed to secure Halawa’s release Share507 Tweet Email2 Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article THE FAMILY OF Ibrahim Halawa has said he has been moved to hospital in the Egyptian prison where he has spent the last three-and-a-half years.A statement from his family said that he was moved to hospital on Tuesday with a heart problem they say has “deteriorated”.An aunt of Halawa’s was said to have visited earlier this week and said that the prison hospital facilities were very poor and that his room had no access to sunlight.His family said in a statement: “We feel the government must do something different and be tougher. It’s time they put a deadline on this.When is Ibrahim’s suffering going to end? He has been in prison for almost four years. His health is not good. He is on hunger strike. How much longer. We feel that we are losing him. The government must act now before it’s too late.AAA-PBP TD Paul Murphy told TheJournal.ie that this latest news on Halawa is “very, very worrying”.He said: “It re-emphasises for everyone who wants to see Ibrahim released that we need to put as much pressure as possible on the Egyptian authorities.Authorities had claimed that he had no heart condition, but that now appears not to be the case. In the immediate term, he must get the medical attention he needs, and then in the long term he needs to be freed. Ibrahim Halawa moved to prison hospital, with the heart condition that the authorities tried to deny he had when we were there. #FreeIbrahim— Paul Murphy (@paulmurphy_TD) February 23, 2017 Short URL Thursday 23 Feb 2017, 6:03 PM Family statement says Ibrahim Halawa moved to prison hospital His family say his heart problem has deteriorated. Feb 23rd 2017, 6:03 PM last_img read more


Sexton on track to face France Schmidt hopeful of Carberys availabilitySexton on track to face France Schmidt hopeful of Carberys availability


first_imgSexton on track to face France, Schmidt ‘hopeful’ of Carbery’s availability The pair trained separately during this morning’s open session in Belfast. https://the42.ie/4519339 Friday 1 Mar 2019, 2:01 PM Mar 1st 2019, 2:01 PM Share Tweet Email1 Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article 30 Comments Subscribe Source: The42 Rugby Weekly/SoundCloudSubscribe to our new podcast, The42 Rugby Weekly, here: Ryan Bailey reports from Queen’s University, BelfastJOE SCHMIDT IS ‘confident’ Joey Carbery’s hamstring injury will not rule him out of the remainder of Ireland’s Six Nations campaign, allaying initial fears that the out-half is also a doubt for Munster’s Heineken Champions Cup quarter-final against Edinburgh.Carbery suffered the injury in training ahead of Ireland’s championship trip to Rome and trained separately to the rest of Schmidt’s squad at this morning’s open session at Queen’s University in Belfast. Carbery is nursing a hamstring injury. Source: Dan Sheridan/INPHOThe 23-year-old — who impressed off the bench during Ireland’s win over Scotland in round two — was given a modified workload under the supervision of an IRFU medic, before Schmidt delivered an update on his fitness.The Ireland head coach said he is ‘hopeful’ Carbery will be fit for next weekend’s game against France at the Aviva Stadium, but the Munster 10 will need to come through sessions at Carton House next Wednesday and Friday. With Johnny Sexton also doing speed and agility work behind the posts, Connacht’s Jack Carty, who made his debut off the bench against Italy, was running reps in the pivot position during the 68-minute hit-out opposite the U20 team.“They’re both on track, Johnny is certainly ahead of Joey,” Schmidt said afterwards. “Johnny is going to be fine [for France], he’ll train next week.“We’re hoping that Joey will be fit to train, potentially on Wednesday.“If he can train Wednesday and do Friday then that’s sufficient lead-in that he can be in contention, so we’ll just have to wait and see. We’d be very confident about Johnny.”There was positive news on CJ Stander, Jordan Larmour, Tadhg Beirne and Garry Ringrose, who all missed the round three win over Italy through injury, but took a full part in this morning’s squad session.Stander was originally ruled out for four weeks with a nasty facial injury suffered on the opening weekend against England, but the Munster number eight is back fit and raring to go.“CJ is fine, he got a poke in the eye but that was fine,” Schmidt continued. “He’s running around refreshed, he’s very keen to be in the mix.”Dan Leavy was in attendance but was reduced to a watching brief in front of a large Friday morning crowd at Queen’s, having trained separately with Robbie Henshaw earlier in the day. Schmidt said both are on a ‘slightly different programme.’ Sexton didn’t train fully on Friday. Source: Dan Sheridan/INPHOLeavy has been struggling with a calf injury and last played in Leinster’s Pro14 win over Connacht over Christmas while Henshaw has been sidelined since sustaining a dead leg against England. Schmidt added: “He [Leavy] and Robbie Henshaw trained this morning, so we’ve got them on a slightly different programme.“He, again, is on track to train potentially on Tuesday next week and hopefully he’ll train Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Robbie is on the same kind of path at the moment.“It’s how they pull up after training this morning, they worked pretty hard this morning and we’ll get a better idea post that.”Seán O’Brien’s workload has been managed by the IRFU medical team this week and the Leinster flanker returned to his province to get through some conditioning work, while there was no sign of Sean Cronin and Jack McGrath among the 21 senior players in Belfast. “Just the volume of work we want to do over the three days, we thought it was better that he spread his work across the week,” the Ireland head coach said of O’Brien’s absence. He’s been in with us a lot, where we try to have a reasonably tight number at camp with us.“With Seán, he was back with Leinster doing a conditioning week and he’ll be back with us on Tuesday.”Quinn Roux, Ultan Dillane, Tom Farrell were absent as they start for Connacht in Saturday’s Pro14 clash against Ospreys, with Caolin Blade named on the bench for Andy Friend’s side, while both John Cooney and Jordi Murphy start Ulster’s trip to Dragons.Bernard Jackman joins Murray Kinsella and Gavan Casey to discuss the backlash to World Rugby’s league proposal, captaincy styles, sports psychology and more in The42 Rugby Weekly. By Ryan Bailey 15,339 Views Short URLlast_img read more


Grippe bientôt un grand sondage sur la vaccinationGrippe bientôt un grand sondage sur la vaccination


first_imgGrippe : bientôt un grand sondage sur la vaccinationL’Institut national de veille sanitaire (INVS) a annoncé une enquête sur la grippe pour janvier 2011.Pour “contribuer aux orientations de la politique vaccinale en France”, l’INVS vient d’annoncer un sondage national, qui permettra d’établir le profil vaccinal des français. L’enquête sera menée par l’institut IPSOS. Les sondés seront tirés au sort et contactés par téléphone. Un enquêteur leur posera plusieurs questions ainsi qu’à d’autres membres du foyer s’il y en a. Le questionnaire aura une durée d’une dizaine de minutes.Grand coup d’envoi de l’étude, début janvier 2001.Le 19 décembre 2010 à 09:06 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img


Lembryon continue de fasciner les chercheurs en France malgré linterdictionLembryon continue de fasciner les chercheurs en France malgré linterdiction


first_imgL’embryon continue de fasciner les chercheurs en France, malgré l’interdictionBien que la recherche sur l’embryon humain soit interdite en France depuis 2004, l’Agence de la biomédecine a délivré des dérogations pour plus de 70 projets de recherche. Deux d’entre eux devraient rapidement déboucher sur des essais cliniques, a-t-elle indiqué.La France interdit la recherche sur l’embryon humain depuis 2004. En revanche, l’Agence de la biomédecine peut, de manière exceptionnelle, délivrer des autorisations aux équipes de chercheurs français qui en font la demande. Pour que la dérogation leur soit accordée, l’Agence évalue la pertinence scientifique et tient compte de l’aspect éthique de leurs projets. De plus, la recherche autorisée doit exclusivement porter sur des embryons surnuméraires (obtenus par fécondation in vitro, lorsqu’il n’y a plus de projet parental, ou lorsqu’ils sont porteurs de maladies génétiques graves et destinés à être détruits) et l’accord des parents est toujours nécessaire. Ainsi, au 31 décembre dernier et depuis 2005, l’Agence a autorisé 76 protocoles de recherche et donné son feu vert à environ 80 demandes d’importation ou de conservation de CESh.En revanche, 12 projets ont été rejetés pour des raisons d’ordre scientifiques ou éthiques, dont un projet d’ordre cosmétique, indique la directrice générale de l’Agence, Emmanuelle Prada-Bordenave. En effet, les études sont surveillées de près et un registre national des cellules souches embryonnaires humaines (CSEh) et des embryons est tenu par l’Agence. De même, des inspections sont organisées et les équipes sont tenues de faire un rapport annuel sur l’avancée de leurs travaux.Etudier les premiers jours d’existence de l’embryon A l’occasion des 3e journées de l’Agence de la biomédecine, Mme Prada-Bordenave, a fait le point sur les recherches en cours. Elles étudient le fonctionnement de l’embryon au tout début de la vie. Il s’agit de savoir comment les cellules différenciées se construisent à partir de la fusion des deux gamètes ou comment s’installe la maladie. Par ailleurs, les recherches portent sur les “cellules différenciées” (qui sont déjà spécialisées), pour régénérer des tissus.Parmi les projets les plus avancés, on trouve ceux qui devraient rapidement aboutir à une demande d’autorisation d’essais cliniques. Mme Prada-Bordenave cite notamment ceux qui visent à utiliser des cellules différenciées pour réparer le muscle cardiaque après un infarctus et pour régénérer la peau dans certains cas d’ulcères. Un troisième projet de recherche, qui n’en est pas encore au même stade, concerne l’œil.Une loi en passe d’évoluer À lire aussiMaladie d’Alzheimer : les femmes discriminées dans la recherche ?En parallèle, les Radicaux de gauche ont fait une proposition de loi qui vise à autoriser la recherche encadrée sur l’embryon. Cette proposition devrait repasser prochainement devant l’Assemblée nationale, après avoir été votée par le Sénat en décembre dernier. “Dans la proposition de loi adoptée par le Sénat, le rôle de l’agence n’est pas modifié, ni dans son principe ni dans son étendue. Il restera obligatoire de demander une autorisation à l’Agence”, précise Mme Prada-Bordenave.Cette situation ne satisfait cependant pas les chercheurs, à l’instar du Dr John de Vos, un chercheur travaillant sur les CESh à Montpellier. “Aujourd’hui, la loi dit que la recherche est interdite mais autorisée par dérogation. Cela peut freiner certaines équipes qui craignent qu’on puisse revenir sur les dérogations ou de ne pas obtenir les financements, et puis c’est très peu lisible, notamment au niveau international, une loi qui interdit cette recherche mais l’autorise en pratique”, déplore-t-il.Le 1 juin 2013 à 09:47 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more


9YearOld NASA Reject Offered Planetarium Job9YearOld NASA Reject Offered Planetarium Job


first_imgStay on target Tune In As Brad Pitt Speaks With NASA Astronaut on ISSNASA Says 2 Asteroids Will Safely Fly By Earth This Weekend Jack Davis, the adorably tenacious fourth grader, turned down for a job at NASA, is being head-hunted by the Liberty Science Center.Davis made headlines this week after he applied to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s vacant Planetary Protection Officer position with a handwritten resume.“I may be nine, but I think I would be fit for the job,” the New Jersey-based boy said. “One of the reasons is my sister says I am an alien.”Davis has seen “almost all the space and alien movies I can,” watches Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., hopes to see Men in Black, and is “great” at video games.Best of all: “I am young, so I can learn to think like an alien.”His age, though, is exactly what’s holding Davis back from becoming Earth’s next PPO. (NASA told him to “study hard and do well in school” so he can one day join the civilian space program.)Just remember, Jack: When one door closes, another opens. In this case, the doors of Liberty Science Center’s forthcoming Jennifer Chalsty Planetarium.Advertised as “the biggest and best planetarium in the western hemisphere,” the projection hall is set to open “in a few months.” And it could use a consultant like Davis.“You can work right here at Liberty Science Center,” President and CEO Paul Hoffman said in a video message to the boy. “It’s gonna be awesome. And I’d like you to be our first Kid Science Advisor. Gimme a call, and we can work this out.”The institution also sent a letter urging the Davis family to get in touch.via Liberty Science CenterOne noticeable omission from the LSC’s correspondence: the promise to match NASA’s six-figure income.“We are not offering a salary,” a science center spokeswoman told CNET, adding that the organization “would love to have him as a kid advisor, until he heads off to NASA in many years.”The Jersey City museum would certainly be a stepping stone for the self-proclaimed “Guardian of the Galaxy,” who reportedly has not yet responded to LSC’s invitation. He’ll have his people call your people.Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.last_img read more


Employer and employee national insurance thresholds to be alignedEmployer and employee national insurance thresholds to be aligned


first_imgAutumn Statement 2016: Chancellor Philip Hammond has announced that employer and employee national insurance (NI) thresholds will be aligned from April 2017.This will see both employees and employers start paying NI on weekly earnings above £157. This will simplify the payment of NI for employers.The current thresholds for 2016/17 stand at £155 per week for employees and £156 for employers.Genevieve Moore, partner at accountancy firm Blick Rothenberg, said: “The Chancellor announced an alignment of employees and employers NI thresholds and this to be a cost to employers.“It is unlikely that this will be a barrier to employment, but the largest employers will pay the most; and they’re not necessarily the most profitable businesses.”last_img


Penton Credit Rating RevisedPenton Credit Rating Revised


first_imgAccording to S&P, Penton’s first quarter revenue increased 11 percent due, in large part, to its merger with Prism Business Media Holdings, which was finalized in February 2007. EBITDA for the quarter increased 33 percent, also due to the merger.Pro forma revenue fell 4 percent, according to S&P, due to weak advertising demand in the company’s publishing segment. Penton isn’t the only b-to-b publisher facing difficulty in the rocky credit market. Last month, S&P revised Cygnus Business Media’s credit rating outlook from stable to negative because of concerns over Cygnus’ significant debt due in 2009. Earlier this year, S&P revised its outlook of Hanley Wood from stable to negative, citing the soft housing market and “weaker than expected” 2007 operating results. A little more than a month after Penton Media called for a salary and hiring freeze, and launched a company-wide revenue reforecasting, Standard & Poors has removed the b-to-b publisher from its CreditWatch program and affirmed its ‘B’ credit rating. “The affirmation and CreditWatch removal follow the company becoming current with its filing of financial statements,” analyst Tulip Lim said in a statement. Penton was placed on CreditWatch on April 24 with what the financial credit rating agency called “negative implications.”Last month, Penton laid off 42 employees in response to certain product groups feeling “the effects of the economic downturn that has impacted much of the business-to-business media industry,” CEO John French [pictured] wrote in a memo to staffers at the time.last_img read more


Remains of child found in burned Tununak homeRemains of child found in burned Tununak home


first_imgAuthorities say the remains of a small child have been recovered from a home that burned down in the western Alaska village of Tununak.KTUU-TV reports that troopers had responded to the fire early Friday, and they initially reported that a young child had been unaccounted for.The remains that were found in the destroyed home are being sent in for an autopsy and an identification of the child.Details about what caused the fire have yet to be released.Investigations in the case are ongoing.last_img


Using lasers to cool and manipulate moleculesUsing lasers to cool and manipulate molecules


first_imgWith molecules, though, things become tricky. The emission of a photon typically sets a molecule to rotating or vibrating. “They don’t return to the same state they started in,” DeMille explains. “The frequency of the laser is no longer correct for its photons to be absorbed by the molecules.” In order to get around this problem, the team at Yale built on a couple of different ideas. He says that Michael di Rosa of Los Alamos National Laboratory pointed out several years ago that certain molecules were not likely to begin vibrating, so that they could be used. However, di Rosa’s scheme would take at least six different lasers working at the same time such that the rotating (and occasionally vibrating) molecules would all absorb photons. A recent idea came from Jun Ye’s group at JILA, who pointed out that some classes of molecules could avoid vibration and rotation, but in these molecules the time needed to complete an absorption-emission cycle would be so long that slowing and cooling would be inefficient. (PhysOrg.com) — “For years, we have been using laser cooling to trap and manipulate atoms,” David DeMille tells PhysOrg.com. “This has been very useful for both basic science and many applications. Recently there has been great interest in cooling and trapping molecules as well. Their rich internal structure makes molecules useful for a wide range of new experiments and possible applications.” Explore further Schematic depiction of the experimental result. Credit: J. Barry Buffer gas cooling could open up the field of ultracold physics Photo of the experimental apparatus, including E. Shuman. Credit: Mellissa DeMillecenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “We took elements of these two ideas,” DeMille says, “and combined them. We looked at situations where you could have the best of both schemes and picked what should be the easiest case.” Using strontium monofluoride, the team at Yale was able to experimentally demonstrate a scheme for optical cycling in this diatomic molecule using two diode lasers, which are common and inexpensive. “We deflected a beam of molecules using a large number of photon kicks from the laser, which is an important step toward laser cooling.”Based on these results, lasercooling of strontium monofluoride should be within reach. “We suggest that by adding one more of these simple diode lasers, we should be able to take it the next level and actually cool the molecules. Our calculations show it should work, and we are in the process of experimenting with it now.”More information: Shuman, Barry, Glenn and DeMille, “Radiative Force from Optical Cycling on a Diatomic Molecule,” Physical Review Letters (2009). Available online: http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.223001. Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Using lasers to cool and manipulate molecules (2009, December 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-12-lasers-cool-molecules.html Of course, the complexity that makes molecules interesting also makes them more difficult to manipulate than atoms. Using lasers to cool molecules, therefore, comes with its own set of problems. DeMille, a scientist at Yale University, believes that a solution may have been found. He has been working with Yale colleagues Edward Shuman, John Barry and David Glenn to come up with a viable method of laser cooling for molecules. Their ideas and preliminary experimental results on the subject can be found in Physical Review Letters: “Radiative Force from Optical Cycling on a Diatomic Molecule.”“Arguably the most difficult part of cooling molecules is trying to apply a force that opposes the molecule’s velocity. For atoms, this is accomplished using the Doppler effect. A moving atom sees incident light at a Doppler-shifted frequency. By the appropriate choice of laser frequency, you can ensure that the atom preferentially absorbs photons opposing its motion.” DeMille says. “The atom receives a small kick along the laser beam from each photon it absorbs, then emits its own photon in a random direction. This cycle returns the atom to its original state, but on average it has been slowed down a little. Do this some tens of thousands of times, and you can slow an atom enough for it to be trapped and manipulated.”last_img read more


Artificial Egg Market Report to Share Key Aspects of The IndustryArtificial Egg Market Report to Share Key Aspects of The Industry


first_imgAn artificial egg has little or no nutrition value compare with the real egg. In the context of China-US trade war and global economic volatility and uncertainty, it will have a big influence on this market.The Global Artificial Egg Market research report presents a comprehensive assessment of the market and contains thoughtful insights, facts, historical data and statistically-supported and industry-validated market data and projections with a suitable set of assumptions and methodology. It provides analysis and information by categories such as market segments, regions, applications and product types and factors influencing market dynamics.Get Specimen of this Report @ https://www.bigmarketresearch.com/request-sample/3247139utm_source=HTN&utm_medium=ShifaliThe report begins with a brief introduction and market overview, in which the Global Artificial Egg Market industry is first defined before estimating its market scope and size. Next, the report elaborates on the market scope and market size estimation. This is followed by an overview of the market segmentation such as type, application, and region. The drivers, limitations, and opportunities are listed for the Global Artificial Egg Market industry, followed by industry news and policies.By Top Market Players: Company AThe report includes an analysis of the growth rate of every segment with the help of charts and tables. In addition, the market across various regions is analyzed in the report, including North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and LAMEA. The report manifests the growth trends and future opportunities in every region.For the future period, sound forecasts on market value and volume are offered for each type and application. In the same period, the report also provides a detailed analysis of market value and consumption for each region. These insights are helpful in devising strategies for the future and take necessary steps. New project investment feasibility analysis and SWOT analysis are offered along with insights on industry barriers. Research findings and conclusions are mentioned at the end.Reasons for Buying This Report:•It Provides A Forward-Looking Perspective on Different Factors Driving or Restraining Market Growth.•It Provides A Ten+ Years Forecast Assessed on the Basis of How the Market Is Predicted to Grow•It Helps in Understanding the Key Product Segments and Their Future.•It Provides Pin Point Analysis of Changing Competition Dynamics and Keeps You Ahead of Competitors.•It Helps in Making Informed Business Decisions by Having Complete Insights of Market and By Making an In-Depth Analysis of Market Segments.Get a discount on this research report @ https://www.bigmarketresearch.com/request-for-discount/3247139?utm_source=HTN&utm_medium=ShifaliAbout Us: Big Market Research has a range of research reports from various publishers across the world. Our database of reports of various market categories and sub-categories would help to find the exact report you may be looking for.Contact Us:Mr. Abhishek PaliwalBig Market Research5933 NE Win Sivers Drive, #205, Portland,OR 97220 United StatesDirect: +1-971-202-1575Toll Free: +1-800-910-6452E-mail: help@bigmarketresearch.com Artificial egglast_img read more


A New Name for SNMA New Name for SNM


first_img Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. A New Name for SNMVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:00Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Information Technology View all 220 items Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Women’s Health View all 62 items AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Speaking with ITN Editorial Director Helen Kuhl at the SNM annual meeting in Miami Beach, Fla., in June, incoming president Frederic H. Fahey, DSc, explains the reasoning behind the society’s name change from Society of Nuclear Medicine to Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. He also shares highlights of the successful 2012 event. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophycenter_img Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Technology Reports View all 9 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Recent Videos View all 606 items Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Videos | Nuclear Imaging | July 26, 2012 A New Name for SNM Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Find more SCCT news and videos Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.last_img read more


Is Costa Ricas antitobacco law encouraging smugglingIs Costa Ricas antitobacco law encouraging smuggling


first_imgTwo years after Costa Rica passed an aggressive national anti-smoking law, the number of illegal smokes seized by law enforcement has skyrocketed by 89 percent, according to figures from the Finance Ministry.Some might point to the law’s tax increase as a driver for contraband and tax evasion on tobacco products, but Fiscal Control Police (PCF) Director Luis Álvaro Bonilla says better police work has more to do with the record-breaking seizures.“What’s changed is our ability to detect irregularities, both contraband and customs fraud,” Bonilla told The Tico Times in a telephone interview. “During the last four years, we’ve developed better ways of working. We’re more focused on organizations [that import illegal cigarettes] and their distribution networks,” he said.“On a large scale, it’s a very profitable business. It’s a vice permitted by the law. Any drug is profitable, be it legal or illicit,” he added.The director said that the law has had little, if any impact on the quantities of illegal cigarettes entering the country. He acknowledged that contraband cigarettes might account for a small portion of the drop in sales of tobacco products since the law’s introduction, but doubted it significantly impacts the illicit trade.Bonilla said that the new focus on the supply side of the problem has resulted in larger seizures. He noted that in 2013, the PCF confiscated over 21 million cigarettes, but they have already seized some 14 million in the first two months of this year.The PCF director added that the logistical infrastructure of criminal organizations is cause for concern. Bonilla said that criminal organizations that specialize in falsifying import invoices or smuggling cigarettes can become a risk for the movement of other illegal substances across the border, as they offer their transportation networks to other criminal groups.“Price is what makes [smuggling cigarettes] attractive,” Bonilla said, explaining that the market for these products was often marginalized or rural communities where habit smokers without means are pushed to cheap, perhaps illegal tobacco.“Anyone paying anything under ₡700 [$1.40] per pack of cigarettes should think there’s something up,” Bonilla said. Much of the illegal tobacco originates in Eastern Europe, China, Panama and Canada, he said.He said that low quality, off-brand cigarettes were the most common smuggled into Costa Rica. These cheap smokes often lack quality controls and officials have found rat droppings, mold and other items besides tobacco inside.“[Contraband cigarettes] don’t only put the state’s financial interests at risk, it becomes a public health concern,” he said. “If smoking tobacco is already bad for your health, smoking low quality cigarettes is even worse.”Bonilla said that tips from the public are essential to breaking up the criminal organizations. Individuals can share tips anonymously by sending an email to pcfdenuncias@hacienda.go.cr or calling (506) 2539-6800. Facebook Comments Related posts:Police seize more than 10,000 contraband cigarettes in San José raids Smugglers play central role in money laundering, say law enforcement Finance Ministry proposes tougher sanctions to crack down on contraband smuggling Booze bootleggers busted after bribe backfireslast_img read more


Tourism Australia recognises The Rocks restaurantsTourism Australia recognises The Rocks restaurants


first_imgA number of restaurants in Sydney’s The Rocks precinct have been recognised for showcasing the excellence of Australian cuisine.The recognition is part of the Restaurant Australia campaign which will showcase Australian food and wine critics, writers, chefs, personalities and celebrities during a gala event in November.The Rocks Ananas Bar & Brasserie and The Argyle are being profiled on the Restaurant Australia campaign as the vanguard of an effort to increase food tourism to the country.Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority chief executive officer Catherine Gallagher said that it was no surprise these Rocks restaurants featured so highly.““The Rocks is brimming with extraordinary places presenting experiences to savour, with something exciting and unexpected to discover around every corner,” Ms Gallagher said.“Restaurants in The Rocks such as Ananas and The Argyle are certainly amongst the very best in dining experiences that Sydney has to offer both local and international visitors.”Tourism Australia has chosen NSW celebrity chefs Neil Perry and Peter Gilmore with the task of preparing the ‘best of Australia’ menu for 80 of the world’s top wine and food influencers. Source = ETB News: Tom Nealelast_img read more


Etihad Aviation leadership transition update interim CEO confirmedEtihad Aviation leadership transition update interim CEO confirmed


first_imgEtihad Aviation leadership transition update, interim CEO confirmedThe Etihad Aviation Group Board of Directors today appointed Ray Gammell as interim Group CEO, and confirmed that James Hogan, current President and Group CEO, will leave the company on 1 July 2017.Consistent with the company’s leadership transition plan, Gammell will assume full management responsibilities from today. Gammell is Etihad Aviation Group’s current Chief People & Performance Officer and has been a member of the Executive Leadership since joining the business in 2009, where he has led the creation of a performance culture across the group.A parallel handover will occur as Ricky Thirion assumes full responsibilities of the Group CFO, James Rigney, who will also leave the company on 1 July 2017. Thirion joined Etihad Airways in 2007 and is the current SVP Group Treasurer.H.E. Mohamed Mubarak Fadhel Al Mazrouei, Chairman of the Board of the Etihad Aviation Group, commented: “Ray and Ricky are experienced leaders and have the complete confidence of the Board. Ray will now take full management responsibility for the Etihad Aviation Group, ensure a coordinated group approach, and continue to advance the strategic review that was initiated by the Board in 2016 to reposition the business for continued development in what we anticipate being a prolonged period of challenges for global aviation.”“We have strengthened our group leadership with recent appointments and are now in the advanced stages of recruitment for a new Group CEO. The Board has been very pleased with the calibre of candidates, and we expect to make an announcement in the next few weeks.”Ray Gammell BiographyRay Gammell was appointed as Interim Group Chief Executive Officer of Etihad Airways Group in May 2017 from his position of Group Chief People and Performance Officer.He joined Etihad in 2009 as a member of the Executive Leadership Team, developing and leading the company’s people strategy to create a performance driven culture, enabling the growth of the business and positioning Etihad as one of the most attractive employers globally and in EMEA.Ray has been responsible for driving the award-winning Emiratisation strategy contributing to the total Emirati workforce of over 3,000 which is the largest nationality among the 154 nationalities at Etihad Aviation Group.Ray has 20 plus years’ leadership experience, gained internationally across the technology, financial and government sectors. He has held executive positions for the Intel Corporation in the US and Ireland, Royal Bank of Scotland, and was an officer in the Irish Armed Forces. He has been a Chief Officer at Etihad Airways for over 8 years.Ray is a chartered fellow at the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development and holds a Masters Degree from University College Dublin. Etihad Aviation GroupSource = Etihad Aviation Grouplast_img read more